UCLA Bruins women's soccer

The UCLA Bruins women's soccer team is an intercollegiate varsity sports team of the University of California at Los Angeles. The team is a member of the Pac-12 Conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The team won its first national championship on December 8, 2013, by defeating Florida State 1–0 in overtime.[2] The Bruins won the program's second national title on December 5, 2022, beating North Carolina 3–2 in double overtime.[3]

UCLA Bruins women's soccer
Founded1937 (1937)
UniversityUniversity of California, Los Angeles
Head coachMargueritte Aozasa (1st season)
ConferencePac-12
LocationLos Angeles, California
StadiumWallis Annenberg Stadium
(Capacity: 2,145)
NicknameBruins
ColorsBlue and gold[1]
   
Home
Away
NCAA Tournament championships
2013, 2022
NCAA Tournament runner-up
2000, 2004, 2005, 2017
NCAA Tournament Semifinals
2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2013, 2017, 2019, 2022
NCAA Tournament Quarterfinals
1997, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2022
NCAA Tournament Round of 16
1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2022
NCAA Tournament appearances
1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022

Stadium

Drake Stadium was the home field of the soccer teams
The teams play home matches at Wallis Annenberg Stadium

The Bruins played their home games on the Frank Marshall Field of Drake Stadium on campus until 2017. The stadium is named in honor of Elvin C. "Ducky" Drake, UCLA's longtime trainer and former student athlete. Film producer Marshall graduated from UCLA.

In 2018, the Bruins moved to the soccer-specific stadium, Wallis Annenberg Stadium, along with the UCLA Bruins men's soccer program. On September 23, 2022, a capacity crowd of 2,237 saw the women's team defeating Cal 4–2 at Annenberg Stadium.

Players

As of December 5, 2022[4]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
0 GK  USA Kelly McManus
00 GK  USA Faith Nguyen
1 GK  USA Lauren Brzykcy
2 FW  USA Kali Trevithick
3 DF  USA Maya Evans
4 DF  USA Lilly Reale
5 DF  USA Kylie Kerr
6 DF  USA Kathryn Kelly
9 MF  USA Sophia Cook
10 MF  USA Ally Lemos
11 DF  USA Madelyn Desiano
12 MF  USA Michaela Rosenbaum
13 MF  USA Emma Egizii
14 FW  USA Julia Saunicheva
15 DF  USA Jayden Perry
17 FW  USA Lexi Wright
18 FW/MF  USA Ellie Walbruch
19 DF  USA Quincy McMahon
No. Pos. Nation Player
20 DF  NOR My Haugland Sørsdahl
21 MF/FW  USA MacKenzee Vance
22 MF  USA Jen Alvarado
23 FW/MF  USA Janae DeFazio
24 MF  MEX Maricarmen Reyes
25 FW  USA Peyton Marcisz
26 MF  MEX Bridgette Marin-Valencia
27 MF  NCA Jackie Gilday
28 FW  MEX America Frias
30 MF/FW  USA Megan Edelman
31 DF  USA Jordyn Gather
32 DF  USA Cori James
33 FW  USA Ally Cook
34 DF  USA Brianne Riley
35 GK  USA Neeku Purcell
50 MF/FW  USA Sunshine Fontes
66 FW  USA Reilyn Turner

Seasons

Updated through October 30, 2022
Season Coach Record Notes
OverallConference
Pac-12 Conference
2011 B. J. Snow 16–1–4 8–1–2 NCAA T-17th, Pac-12 2nd
2012 B. J. Snow 18–3–2 8–2–1 NCAA T-5th, Pac-12 2nd
2013 Amanda Cromwell 22–1–3 9–0–2 NCAA Champions, Pac-12 1st
2014 Amanda Cromwell 21–0–2 10–0–1 NCAA Quarterfinals, Pac-12 1st
2015 Amanda Cromwell 8-10-1 4-6-1 Missed the NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship, Pac-12 8th
2016 Amanda Cromwell 15-6-1 7-3-1 NCAA Round of 16, Pac-12 4th
2017 Amanda Cromwell 19–3–3 8–2–1 NCAA 2nd, Pac-12 T-2nd
2018 Amanda Cromwell 17-3-2 9–2 NCAA T-5th, Pac-12 2nd
2019 Amanda Cromwell 18-5-1 8–3 NCAA T-3rd, Pac-12 2nd
2020 Amanda Cromwell 13-1-3 9-1-1 NCAA Round of 16, Pac-12 1st
2021 Amanda Cromwell 16–1–3 8–0–3 NCAA , Pac-12 1st
2022 Margueritte Aozasa 17–1 9–1 Best start in program history; new record crowd (2,446) set on October 30, 2022 at Wallis Annenberg Stadium; Rank No. 1

Source: UCLA Athletics

Postseason

The UCLA Bruins have an NCAA Division I Tournament record of 71–22 (including penalty kicks) through twenty-one appearances.

One of their most notable runs, the No.2-seeded Bruins trounced their first three opponents each by a 5–0 margin, before falling in the Elite Eight to the No.1-seeded UNC Tar Heels, who lead the nation with 22 NCAA Championship titles in program history. The match was decided in penalty kicks after regular time and overtime ended in a 2–2 draw. [5]

Year Round Opponent Result
1995First roundWashingtonL 1–2
1997First round
Second round
Third round
Portland
SMU
Notre Dame
W 1–0
W 3–2
L 0–8
1998Second roundBYUL 0–2
1999Second round
Third round
San Diego
Santa Clara
W 2–1
L 0–7
2000Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
USC
Texas A&M
Clemson
Portland
North Carolina
W 3–0
W 4–0
W 2–1
W 1–0
L 1–2
2001First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
CSU Fullerton
Pepperdine
Dayton
Florida
W 3–0
W 2–1
W 3–1
L 0–1
2002First round
Second round
Third round
Loyola Marymount
USC
Texas A&M
W 4–0
W 1–0
L 0–1
2003First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
San Diego
Pepperdine
Kansas
Penn State
North Carolina
W 2–0
W 2–0
W 1–0
W 4–0
L 0–3
2004First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
Pepperdine
San Diego
Duke
Ohio State
Princeton
Notre Dame
W 1–0
W 3–0
W 2–0
W 1–0
W 2–0
L 1–2
2005First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
Mississippi Valley State
Colorado
Marquette
Virginia
Florida State
Portland
W 9–0
W 3–0
W 4–0
W 5–0
W 4–0
L 0–4
2006First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
UNLV
CSU Fullerton
Florida
Portland
North Carolina
W 6–1
W 3–1
W 3–2
W 2–1
L 0–2
2007First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
CSU Fullerton
Oklahoma State
Virginia
Portland
USC
W 3–1
W 4–0
W 2–1
W 3–2
L 1–2
2008First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Fresno State
San Diego
USC
Duke
North Carolina
W 5–0
W 1–0
W 1–0
W 6–1
L 0–1
2009First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Boise State
San Diego State
Virginia
Portland
Stanford
W 7–1
W 5–0
W 3–0
W 2–1
L 1–2
2010First round
Second round
Third round
BYU
UCF
Stanford
W 1–0
W 2–1
L 0–3
2011First round
Second round
New Mexico
San Diego
W 1–0
L 1–2
2012First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Wisconsin
Kentucky
San Diego State
Stanford
W 1–0
W 5–0
W 3–0
L 1–2
2013First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
San Diego State
Kentucky
Stanford
North Carolina
Virginia
Florida State
W 3–0
W 3–0
W 2–0
W 1–0
W 2–1
W 1–0
2014First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
San Diego
Harvard
Pepperdine
Virginia
W 5–0
W 7–0
W 1–0
L 1–2
2016First round
Second round
Third round
Seattle
Nebraska
West Virginia
W 3–0
W 2–0
L 1–2
2017First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
San Diego State
Northwestern
Virginia
Princeton
Duke
Stanford
W 3–1
W 1–0
W 2–1
W 3–1
W 1–0
L 2–3
2018First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
San Jose State
Minnesota
NC State
North Carolina
W 5–0
W 5–0
W 5–0
L 2–4
2019First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Lamar
Clemson
Wisconsin
Florida State
Stanford
W 4–1
W 5–0
W 2–0
W 4–0
L 1–4
2020First round
Second round
Third round

Iowa
#6 Clemson

W 2–1
L 1–1
2021First roundUC IrvineL 0–1
2022First round
Second round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
Northern Arizona
UCF
Northwestern
Virginia
Alabama
North Carolina
W 4–1
W 1–1 (3-0PK)
W 2–0
W 2–1
W 3–0
W 3–2

Notable alumni

This list of former players includes those who received international caps, made significant contributions to the team in terms of appearances or goals, or who made significant contributions to the sport after they left. It is clearly not yet complete and all inclusive, and additions and refinements will continue to be made over time.

Another notable Bruin is Mallory Pugh, who played just one season at UCLA before going professional. She is a starting forward on the U.S. women's national team as well as on the Washington Spirit in the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL).

Head coaches

References

  1. "Style Guide // UCLA Athletics for Print and Digital Applications" (PDF). UCLA Nike Jordan Style Guide. July 7, 2021. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  2. Nolan Hayes, UCLA wins national championship, defeats Florida State 1-0 in overtime, The Associated Press via NCAA.com, December 8, 2013
  3. Alder, EM (2022-12-05). "UCLA women's soccer pulls off miracle comeback over North Carolina for NCAA title". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2022-12-05.
  4. "2022 Women's Soccer Roster".
  5. "Division I Women's Soccer Championships Records Book" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.