Tella

Tella or talla (Amharic ጠላ; Oromo: farsoo, Tigrinya: siwa) is a traditional beer from Ethiopia. It is brewed from various grains, typically teff and sorghum. Depending on region, barley, wheat, or maize may be used; spices can also be added. Dried and ground shiny-leaf buckthorn leaves are used for fermentation. Due to the addition of bread and use of a fermentation vessel which has been smoked over dried olive wood or Abyssinian rose wood, tella may have a smoky flavour. The alcohol content of unfiltered Tella is usually around 2–4 Volume percent, filtered tella contains about 5–6 vol%.

Teff and sorghum, Tella grains

Tella is often home-brewed.[1] It may be offered in tella houses (tellabet), usually in regular homes, where people meet and talk to each other.

Tella was commonly used for kiddush by the Beta Israel (Ethiopian Jews). Tella was used because wine was often unavailable. Due to the availability of wine in Israel, Ethiopian-Israelis generally use wine for kiddush instead of tella.[2]

See also

  • The Tigrayan Siwa (beer) culture
  • Tej, an Ethiopian and Eritrean honey wine
  • List of Ethiopian dishes and foods
  • Eritrean cuisine

References

  1. By Pamela Goyan Kittler, Kathryn P. Sucher, Marcia Nelms (22 Aug 2011). Food and Culture. Cengage Learning. p. 202.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. Marks, Gil (1996). The World of Jewish Cooking. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster. p. 100, 273. ISBN 9780684835594.


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