Telegraph (Brisbane)

The Telegraph was an evening newspaper published in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. It was first published on 1 October 1872 and its final edition appeared on 5 February 1988. In its day it was recognised as one of the best news pictorial newspapers in the country.[1] Its Pink Sports edition (printed distinctively on pink newsprint and sold on Brisbane streets from about 6 pm on Saturdays) was a particularly excellent production produced under tight deadlines. It included results and pictures of Brisbane's Saturday afternoon sports including the results of the last horse race of the day.

History

In 1871 a group of local businessmen, Robert Armour, John Killeen Handy (M.L.A. for Brisbane), John Warde, John Burns, J. D. Heale and J. K. Buchanan formed the Telegraph Newspaper Co. Ltd. The editor was Theophilus Parsons Pugh, a former editor of the Brisbane Courier and founder of Pugh's Almanac.[2] The first edition of the newspaper had just four pages and a print run of only 200 copies.[1] In 1963 it moved from its 93 Queen Street premises[3] to its final home in 41 Campbell Street, Bowen Hills (Queensland Newspapers).

Digitisation

The paper has been digitised as part of the Australian Newspapers Digitisation Program of the National Library of Australia.[4][5]

Notable staff

  • Sallyanne Atkinson, journalist (1960 to 1962)
  • Ken Blanch, reporter[6]
  • Peter Charlton, later the Courier-Mail's national affairs editor, was the business editor of The Courier-Mail and Brisbane Telegraph.[7]
  • James Cowlishaw, managing director in 1878.[8][9][10][11]
  • Alfred Cecil Chave, journalist, 1930[12]
  • Nat Gould[13]
  • Barton Green[14]
  • Patrick Hamilton, 1998 Walkley Award winning photojournalist[15]
  • Thomas William Heney (1920 to 1923)[16]
  • Mark Hinchliffe joined as the sports sub-editor in 1981.[17]
  • Hector Holthouse, journalist
  • Lionel Ker Strutton Hogg[18]
  • Edgar George Holt
  • Lincoln Howes, now part of the 60 Minutes team, started his career at Brisbane's Telegraph[19]
  • Harry Jefferies, Sports Editor[20]
  • Chris Mitchell, cadet journalist at the Telegraph, later editor-in-chief of The Australian (2002–2015)[21]
  • Mitchell Murphy, now with Brisbane Times, was reporter and columnist covering elite level sport for both the Brisbane Telegraph and Daily Sun.[22]
  • Pendil Arthur Rayner (1928 as a cadet (cub) reporter – 1943)[23]
  • Kevin Sinclair, reporter, 1962
  • Frederick William Ward, editor (1916 – December 1920)[24]
  • Charles Wilmott, Assistant Messenger Overseer in the Brisbane Telegraph Office.[25]

References

  1. Daily Sun, Saturday, 6 February 1988
  2. Queensland Press Limited history report 1975. Sourced Qld Newspapers archive library December 2008
  3. "Masthead". Brisbane Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 1 January 1954. p. 1 (LAST RACE). Retrieved 7 July 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  4. "Newspaper and magazine titles". Trove. Archived from the original on 29 February 2016. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  5. "Newspaper Digitisation Program". Trove. Archived from the original on 2 July 2015. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  6. "New light on Brisbane's most infamous murder case". ABC News. Archived from the original on 5 January 2010. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  7. "Bio: Peter Charlton" Archived 28 July 2008 at the Wayback Machine, Courier Mail
  8. "Cowlishaw, James (1834–1929)" Archived 3 August 2008 at the Wayback Machine, Australian Dictionary of Biography
  9. "James Cowlishaw". belindacohen.tripod.com. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  10. "Thomas Cowlishaw". belindacohen.tripod.com. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  11. 23 August 1883 Archived 16 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine, The Brisbane Courier
  12. "Chave, Alfred Cecil (1905–1971)" Archived 30 July 2008 at the Wayback Machine, Australian Dictionary of Biography
  13. "Gould, Nat, 1857-1919." lib.monash.edu.au. Archived from the original on 30 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  14. "'Bio: Barton Green, Director'". Archived from the original on 22 July 2008. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  15. "Walkley Winners Archive". The Walkley Foundation. Archived from the original on 8 December 2015. Retrieved 5 January 2016.
  16. Serle, Percival (1949). "Heney, Thomas William". Dictionary of Australian Biography. Sydney: Angus and Robertson.
  17. "Bio: Mark Hinchliffe" Archived 22 January 2009 at the Wayback Machine, Courier Mail
  18. Lionel Hogg (15 April 2008). "You wouldn't read about it". On Line Opinion. Archived from the original on 20 August 2008.
  19. "Bio: Lincoln Howes" Archived 15 September 2008 at the Wayback Machine, 60 Minutes
  20. "Home - Redcliffe Dolphins". Redcliffe Dolphins. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 24 April 2018.
  21. Davidson, Darren (2 December 2015). "Chris Mitchell retires, Paul Whittaker new editor-in-chief of The Australian". The Australian. Retrieved 4 January 2016.
  22. "Bio: Mitchell Murphy" Archived 24 September 2008 at the Wayback Machine, Brisbane Times
  23. Australia's Accredited Dead Archived 5 January 2009 at the Wayback Machine, by Doral Chenoweth
  24. "Ward, Frederick William (1847–1934)" Archived 7 August 2008 at the Wayback Machine, Australian Dictionary of Biography
  25. "Persons called before Queensland Government Committees". State Library of Queensland. Archived from the original on 27 September 2008.

Photos

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