Oyakodon

Oyakodon (親子丼), literally "parent-and-child donburi", is a donburi, or Japanese rice bowl dish, in which chicken, egg, sliced scallion (or sometimes regular onions), and other ingredients are all simmered together in a kind of soup that is made with soy sauce and stock, and then served on top of a large bowl of rice. The name of the dish is a poetic reflection of both chicken and egg being used in the dish.[1]

Oyakodon
Oyakodon
TypeDonburi
Place of originJapan
Created byTamahide
Invented1891
Main ingredientsChicken, egg, and sliced scallion
Ingredients generally usedSoy sauce and stock
VariationsTanindon

History

The origins of the dish are unknown. The earliest written mention of the terms "oyako" and "don" in combination is in a newspaper advertisement for a restaurant in Kobe in 1884. The advertisement mentions dishes named oyakojōdon, oyakonamidon and oyakochūdon, possibly referring to different sizes.[2]

Variations

Several other Japanese dishes pun on the parent-and-child theme of oyakodon. Tanindon (他人丼), literally "stranger bowl",[3] is otherwise identical but replaces the chicken with beef or pork. A dish of salmon and salmon roe served raw over rice is known as sake oyakodon (鮭親子丼) (salmon parent-child donburi).

See also

  • Gyūdon, beef on rice
  • Katsudon, pork cutlets on rice
  • "Mother and Child Reunion", a Paul Simon song that takes its title from a similar chicken and egg dish

References

  1. "親子丼(オヤコドンブリ)とは - Definition of "Oyakodon" (In Japanese)".
  2. "明治36年(1903)、第五回内国勧業博覧会開催時に、親子丼が販売提供されていたか知りたい。 (in Japanese)". Collaborative Reference Database. 8 March 2011.
  3. "関西の他人丼を知っていますか?地方の丼紹介!". TRENDRIPPLE(とれんどりっぷる) (in Japanese). Retrieved 2015-12-06.
    Pamela Goyan Kittler; Kathryn P. Sucher; Marcia Nelms (22 August 2011). Food and Culture. Cengage Learning. p. 327. ISBN 978-1-285-22561-6.
  • Tsuji, Shizuo (1980). Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. New York: Kodansha International/USA. ISBN 0-87011-399-2.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.