List of retired Pacific typhoon names

This is a list of all Pacific typhoons that have had their names retired from the international list of tropical cyclone names used in the Western Pacific Ocean. Since tropical cyclones started to be named in the basin after World War Two a total of 65 typhoon names have been retired. Those typhoons that have their names retired tend to be exceptionally destructive storms. Several names were removed or altered naming list for various reasons other than retirement. Collectively, the typhoons with retired names have caused over $108 billion in damage (2023 USD), as well as over 12,000 deaths.

Typhoon Haiyan at peak intensity

Background

The practice of using names to identify tropical cyclones goes back several centuries, with systems named after places, saints or things they hit before the formal start of naming in the Western Pacific.[1] These included the Kamikaze, 1906 Hong Kong typhoon, 1922 Shantou typhoon and the 1934 Muroto typhoon.[2]

The practice of retiring significant names was started during 1955 by the United States Weather Bureau in the Northern Atlantic basin, after hurricanes Carol, Edna, and Hazel struck the East Coast of the United States and caused a significant amount of damage in the previous year.[3] Initially the names were only designed to be retired for ten years after which they might be reintroduced; however, it was decided at the 1969 Interdepartmental hurricane conference, that any significant hurricane in the future would have its name permanently retired.[3][4] The first tropical cyclone names to be retired in the Western Pacific were Lucille and Ophelia during 1960. Several names have been removed from the Pacific naming lists for various other reasons than causing a significant amount of death/destruction, which include being pronounced in a very similar way to other names and political reasons.[5][6]

In 2000, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) began naming tropical cyclones from a list of 140 names, submitted by 14 countries. Previously, the JMA labeled storms with numbers, but not names. The JMA has been the official warning agency of the western Pacific Ocean since 1981, though other organizations have also tracked typhoons. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) unofficially named tropical cyclones from 1947 to 1999.[7] During this time period, there were several pre-determined tropical cyclone lists, in which many names were removed and replaced with others.[8] The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) names tropical cyclones using a separate list, which is adjusted periodically.[9]


Between 1947 and 2000, eleven names of significant tropical cyclones were retired from the list of names used by the United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center.[10] During this time other names were removed from the naming lists, including in 1979 when the lists of names used were revised to include both male and female names.[10][11] Tropical Storm Lucille was the first name to be retired for its impacts, while Ophelia was retired because of its long 8,045 km (5,000 mi) track.[10]

At the 33rd session of the typhoon committee held in November 2000, the committee was informed that the India Meteorological Department had objected to the name Hanuman being used as a name because of potential religious sentiments.[12] Thailand also requested that the spelling of several names be corrected and indicated a desire to change the names Prapiroon, Durian and Khanun.[12] The representatives of the United States of America also requested that the name Kodo be changed as it would have an undesirable meaning if mispronounced.[12] The session subsequently accepted the spelling changes as well as the requests from Thailand and the United States and established that both countries would submit a list of four names in priority order to its Secretariat within a week of the session ending.[12] The Typhoon Committee Secretariat would then circulate the list to all members for comment, with the highest priority name acceptable to all members used.[12] The secretariat subsequently reported to the following years session that the names Morakot and Aere had replaced Hanuman and Kodo.[13]


Names

Name Replacement
name
Dates active Peak
classification
Sustained wind
speeds (10-min)
Pressure Areas
affected
Damage (USD) Deaths Refs
LucilleNot replacedMay 25 – June 4, 1960Tropical stormNot Specified985 hPa (29.09 inHg)Philippines$2 million300–500[14][15][16][17]
OpheliaNot replacedNovember 21 
December 6, 1960
TyphoonNot Specified925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Caroline IslandsUnknown2[10][15]
KarenKimNovember 7 – 17, 1962TyphoonNot Specified900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Guam$250 million11[18]
BessBonnieOctober 8 – 14, 1974TyphoonNot Specified975 hPa (28.79 inHg)Philippines, China, Vietnam$9.2 million32[10][19][20]
BessBrendaJuly 21 – August 3, 1982Typhoon230 km/h (145 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Japan$2.32 billion95[21]
IkeIanAugust 26 
September 6, 1984
Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Guam, Philippines, China$1 billion1,142
RoyRyanJanuary 7 – 19, 1988Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Micronesia, Philippines$28.5 million2
MikeMannyNovember 5 – 18, 1990Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)915 hPa (27.02 inHg)Micronesia, Philippines, China$389 million748
MireilleMelissaSeptember 13 – 27, 1991Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Mariana Islands, Japan, South Korea$10 billion66
ThelmaTeresaNovember 1 – 8, 1991Tropical storm75 km/h (45 mph)992 hPa (29.29 inHg)Philippines, Vietnam$27.7 million5,081–8,145[22][23][24][25]
OmarOscarAugust 20 
September 6, 1992
Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)920 hPa (27.17 inHg)Mariana Islands, Guam, Taiwan, China$561 million15
VameiPeipahDecember 26, 2001 
January 1, 2002
Tropical storm85 km/h (50 mph)1006 hPa (29.71 inHg)Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia$3.6 million5[nb 1][26]
ChataanMatmoJune 27 – July 13, 2002Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Chuuk, Guam, Japan$660 million54[27][28][29]
RusaNuriAugust 22 – September 4, 2002Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Japan, Korean Peninsula$4.2 billion238[30]
PongsonaNoulDecember 2 – 12, 2002Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Mariana Islands$730 million1[31][32]
YanyanDolphinJanuary 11 – 21, 2003Tropical storm65 km/h (40 mph)1000 hPa (29.53 inHg)Mariana IslandsNoneNone
ImbudoMolaveJuly 15 – 25, 2003Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Philippines, China$340 million64[33][34][35]
MaemiMujigaeSeptember 4 – 16, 2003Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)910 hPa (26.87 inHg)Korean Peninsula$4.8 billion117[30]
SudalMirinaeApril 2 – 18, 2004Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Yap, Guam$14 millionNone[36]
TingtingLionrockJune 24 – July 4, 2004Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)955 hPa (28.20 inHg)Mariana Islands, Japan$23.7 million12
RananimFanapiAugust 6 – 15, 2004Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)China, Japan$2.44 billion169[37][38]
MatsaPakharJuly 30 – August 9, 2005Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)China, Taiwan$2.23 billion29[39][40]
NabiDoksuriAugust 29 – September 9, 2005Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Mariana Islands, Japan, South Korea$535 million32
LongwangHaikuiSeptember 25 – October 3, 2005Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Taiwan, China$971 million149[41][42][43]
[44][45][46]
ChanchuSanbaMay 8 – 19, 2006Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Philippines, Taiwan, China, Vietnam$478 million268[47][48]
BilisMaliksiJuly 8 – 16, 2006Severe tropical storm110 km/h (70 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Philippines, Taiwan, China$4.4 billion859[49][50][51]
SaomaiSon-TinhAugust 4 – 11, 2006Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Mariana Islands, Taiwan, China$2.5 billion458[51][52]
XangsaneLeepiSeptember 25 – October 2, 2006Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand$750 million312[53][54][55][56]
DurianMangkhutNovember 25 – December 7, 2006Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)915 hPa (27.02 inHg)Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand>$400 million>1,500[57][58][59][60]
MorakotAtsaniAugust 2 – 12, 2009Typhoon140 km/h (85 mph)945 hPa (27.91 inHg)Taiwan, China, Korean Peninsula$6.2 billion789
KetsanaChampiSeptember 23 – 30, 2009Typhoon130 km/h (80 mph)960 hPa (28.35 inHg)Philippines, Vietnam, Laos
Cambodia, Thailand
$1.09 billion710[61]
ParmaIn-faSeptember 27 – October 14, 2009Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Philippines, China, Vietnam$617 million500
FanapiRaiSeptember 14 – 21, 2010Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Taiwan, China$1 billion105[62][63]
WashiHatoDecember 13 – 19, 2011Severe tropical storm95 km/h (60 mph)992 hPa (29.29 inHg)Micronesia, Palau, Philippines₱2.07 billion1,268[64][65]
VicenteLanJuly 18 – 25, 2012Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Philippines, China
Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar
$324 million13[66]
BophaAmpilNovember 25 – December 9, 2012Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Micronesia, Philippines$1.04 billion1,901[67]
SonamuJongdariJanuary 1 – 10, 2013Severe tropical storm95 km/h (60 mph)990 hPa (29.23 inHg)Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia Minimal2[68][69]
UtorBarijatAugust 8 – 18, 2013Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Philippines, China$3.56 billion97[70][71][72]
FitowMunSeptember 29 – October 7, 2013Typhoon140 km/h (85 mph)960 hPa (28.35 inHg)China, Taiwan, Japan$10.4 billion12[70]
HaiyanBailuNovember 3 – 11, 2013Typhoon230 km/h (145 mph)895 hPa (26.43 inHg)Palau, Philippines, Vietnam, China$4.55 billion8,052[70][73]
RammasunBualoiJuly 9 – 20, 2014Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Philippines, China, Vietnam$8.08 billion222[74][75][76]
SoudelorSaudelJuly 29 – August 11, 2015Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Mariana Islands, Japan, Taiwan, China$3.84 billion40[77]
MujigaeSurigaeSeptember 30 – October 5, 2015Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Philippines, China$4.25 billion29[77]
KoppuKogumaOctober 12 – 21, 2015Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Philippines$309 million62[77]
MelorCempakaDecember 9 – 17, 2015Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Philippines$149 million51[77]
MerantiNyatohSeptember 9 – 16, 2016Typhoon220 km/h (140 mph)890 hPa (26.28 inHg)Philippines, Taiwan, China$4.8 billion47
SarikaTrasesOctober 13 – 19, 2016Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Philippines, China, Vietnam$876 million37
HaimaMulanOctober 14 – 22, 2016Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Philippines, Taiwan, China$976 million19
Nock-tenHinnamnorDecember 20 – 28, 2016Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)915 hPa (27.02 inHg)Philippines$128 million13
HatoYamanekoAugust 19 – 24, 2017Typhoon140 km/h (85 mph)965 hPa (28.50 inHg)Philippines, Taiwan, China, Vietnam$6.82 billion24[78]
Kai-takYun-yeungDecember 13 – 23, 2017Tropical storm75 km/h (45 mph)994 hPa (29.35 inHg)Philippines, Malaysia$75 million83[79]
TembinKoinuDecember 20 – 26, 2017Typhoon130 km/h (80 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam$42.4 million266[80]
RumbiaPulasanAugust 15 – 18, 2018Tropical storm85 km/h (50 mph)985 hPa (29.09 inHg)Japan, China$5.36 billion53[81]
MangkhutKrathonSeptember 7 – 17, 2018Typhoon205 km/h (125 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Guam, Philippines, Taiwan, China$3.74 billion134[82]
YutuYinxingOctober 21 – November 2, 2018Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Caroline Islands, Mariana Islands, Philippines, South China, Taiwan$854 million30[83][84][85]
LekimaCo-MayAugust 2 – 13, 2019Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Caroline Islands, Philippines, Ryukyu Islands, Taiwan, South Korea, China$9.28 billion90
FaxaiNongfaSeptember 2 – 9, 2019Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)955 hPa (28.20 inHg)Japan$8.12 billion3
HagibisRagasaOctober 4 – 13, 2019Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)915 hPa (27.02 inHg)Mariana Islands, Japan, South Korea, Russian Far East, Aleutian Islands, Alaska>$15 billion98
KammuriKotoNovember 24 – December 6, 2019Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Caroline Islands, Mariana Islands, Philippines$116 million12
PhanfoneNokaenDecember 19 – 29, 2019Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Caroline Islands, Philippines$67.2 million50
VongfongPenhaMay 8 – 18, 2020Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)960 hPa (28.35 inHg)Palau, Philippines, Taiwan$50 million5
LinfaPeilouOctober 6 – 12, 2020Tropical storm75 km/h (45 mph)994 hPa (29.35 inHg)Philippines, Indochina$217 million138
MolaveNarraOctober 22 – 29, 2020Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Philippines, Spratly Islands, Malaysia, Indochina$660 million71
GoniGaenariOctober 26 – November 6, 2020Typhoon220 km/h (140 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Philippines, Indochina$415 million32
VamcoBang-LangNovember 8 – 15, 2020Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)955 hPa (28.20 inHg)Philippines, Indochina$440 million102
References:[nb 2][nb 3][nb 4][nb 5][nb 6]

See also

Notes

  1. The name Vamei was retired because it was the first tropical cyclone recorded near the equator.[10]
  2. Reference for the retired names between 1947 and 2010.[10]
  3. Reference for dates, season, wind speeds and pressure between 2000 and 2022 [86]
  4. Reference for the retired names between 2000 and 2016.[87]
  5. Reference for the retired names between 2000 and 2018.[88]
  6. Reference for the retired names between 1947 and 2013.[5]

References

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