La Liga Filipina

La Liga Filipina (lit.'The Philippine League') was a secret organization. It was founded by José Rizal in the house of Doroteo Ongjunco at Ilaya Street, Tondo, Manila on July 3, 1892.[1][2]

La Liga Filipina
SuccessorCuerpo de Compromisarios
Katipunan
FormationJuly 3, 1892 (1892-07-03)
FounderJosé Rizal
Founded atTondo, Manila,
Captaincy General of the Philippines
President
Ambrosio Salvador
AffiliationsPropaganda Movement

The organization derived from La Solidaridad and the Propaganda movement.[3] The purpose of La Liga Filipina was to build a new group that sought to involve the people directly in the reform movement.[4]

The league was to be a sort of mutual aid and self-help society dispensing scholarship funds and legal aid, loaning capital and setting up cooperatives, the league became a threat to Spanish authorities that they arrested Rizal on July 6, 1892, then he was sent to Dapitan.[5]

During the exile of Rizal, The organization became inactive,[6] though through the efforts of Domingo Franco and Andrés Bonifacio,[7] it was reorganized. The organization decided to declare its support for La Solidaridad and the reforms it advocated, raise funds for the paper, and defray the expenses of deputies advocating reforms for the country before the Spanish Cortes. Eventually after some disarray in the leadership of the group, the Supreme Council of the League dissolved the society.[8]

The Liga membership split into two groups when it is about to be revealed: the conservatives formed the Cuerpo de Compromisarios which pledged to continue supporting the La Solidaridad while the radicals led by Bonifacio devoted themselves to a new and secret society, the Katipunan.

Aims

The cover page of the constitution of La Liga Filipina
  • To unite the whole archipelago into one vigorous and homogeneous organization
  • Mutual protection in every want and necessity
  • Defense against all violence and injustice
  • Encouragement of instruction, agriculture, and commerce
  • Study the application of reforms

Members of La Liga Filipina

Directors

  • José Rizal, founder
  • Ambrosio Salvador, president of the league
  • Agustín de la Rosa, fiscal
  • Bonifacio Arévalo, treasurer
  • Deodato Arellano, secretary and first supreme leader of Katipunan

Exile of Rizal


Other members

  • Andrés Bonifacio, supreme leader of Katipunan and led the Cry of Pugad Lawin
  • Mamerto Natividad, one of the leaders of the revolution in Nueva Ecija
  • Moises Salvador, master of lodge of the mason in Balagtas
  • Numeriano Adriano, chief guard of lodge of the mason in Balagtas
  • José A. Dizon, master of lodge of the mason in Taliba
  • Ambrosio Rianzares Bautista, war adviser during First Philippine Republic, author of Philippine Declaration of Independence.
  • Timoteo Lanuza, stated the depose to dispel the Spanish frail in the Philippine in 1889.
  • Marcelino de Santos, bidder and assistant of La Solidaridad.
  • Paulino Zamora, master of lodge of the mason in Lusong
  • Procopio Bonifacio
  • Juan Zulueta, member of lodge of the mason in Lusong, Member of Supreme Council.
  • Doroteo Ongjunco, member of lodge of the mason in Lusong
  • Arcadio del Rosario, publicist of lodge of the mason in Balagtas
  • Timoteo Páez, a member of Supreme Council
  • Mariano Limjap, financier of La Liga Filipina [9]

References

  1. Halili, M. c (2004). Philippine History. Rex Bookstore, Inc. p. 136. ISBN 9789712339349. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  2. Keat Gin Ooi, ed. (2004). Southeast Asia: A Historical Encyclopedia, from Angkor Wat to East Timor. ABC-CLIO. p. 755. ISBN 1576077705.
  3. Francia, Luis H. (2013). History of the Philippines: From Indios Bravos to Filipinos. Abrams. ISBN 9781468315455. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  4. Halili, M. c (2004). Philippine History. Rex Bookstore, Inc. p. 136. ISBN 9789712339349. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  5. Zaide, Gregorio F. (1976). Rizal: His Exile to Dapitan. St. Mary's. p. 193. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  6. Guillermo, Artemio R. (2012). Historical Dictionary of the Philippines. Scarecrow Press. p. 246. ISBN 9780810872462. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  7. "Franco, Domingo T." CulturEd: Philippine Cultural Education Online. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  8. Ooi, Keat Gin (2004). Southeast Asia: A Historical Encyclopedia, from Angkor Wat to East Timor. ABC-CLIO. p. 755. ISBN 9781576077702. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  9. Chu, Richard (2010). Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila: Family, Identity, and Culture, 1860s-1930s. Brill. p. 249. ISBN 978-90-0417339-2.
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