John Lee Ka-chiu

John Lee Ka-chiu GBM SBS PDSM PMSM (Chinese: 李家超; born 7 December 1957[1]) is a Hong Kong politician and former police officer who is the 5th and current Chief Executive of Hong Kong.

John Lee
李家超
Lee in 2019
5th Chief Executive of Hong Kong
Assumed office
1 July 2022
PresidentXi Jinping
PremierLi Keqiang
Preceded byCarrie Lam
8th Chief Secretary for Administration
In office
25 June 2021  7 April 2022
Chief ExecutiveCarrie Lam
Preceded byMatthew Cheung
Succeeded byEric Chan
5th Secretary for Security
In office
1 July 2017  25 June 2021
Chief ExecutiveCarrie Lam
Preceded byLai Tung-kwok
Succeeded byChris Tang
2nd Under Secretary for Security
In office
1 October 2012  1 July 2017
SecretaryLai Tung-kwok
Preceded byLai Tung-kwok
Succeeded bySonny Au
Personal details
Born
Lee Ka-chiu

(1957-12-07) December 7, 1957
British Hong Kong
Nationality
Spouse
Janet Lam
(m. 1980)
Children
  • Gilbert Lee Man-lung
  • Lee Man-chun
EducationWah Yan College Kowloon
Alma materCharles Sturt University (MPPA)
Signature
Police career
DepartmentHong Kong Police Force
Service years1977–2012
RankDeputy Commissioner of Police (Management)
Awards
Chinese name
Chinese李家超

Originally a police officer, Lee served as the Deputy Commissioner of the Hong Kong Police Force from 2010 to 2012. He was appointed Under Secretary of Security by Leung Chun-ying in 2012. After Carrie Lam became Chief Executive in 2017, he was promoted to Secretary for Security. In 2021, he succeeded Matthew Cheung as Chief Secretary for Administration, a post which he served until 2022. A pro-Beijing politician, Lee is known as being a hardliner against the pro-democracy camp in Hong Kong, having played a key role in the crackdown of the opposition.

As the sole candidate approved by China in the 2022 Hong Kong Chief Executive election, Lee was chosen as Hong Kong's next Chief Executive, taking office 1 July 2022.[2] His selection was seen as a move by the Chinese government to focus further on security and further integrate Hong Kong with the mainland.[3]

Early life

In 1980, John Lee married Janet Lam at a young age, with whom he has two sons, Gilbert Lee Man-lung and Lee Man-chun.[4] Lee did not attend university after secondary school.[5]

Career

Police officer

On 15 August 1977,[6] at the age of 19, Lee joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a probationary inspector. He became a Chief Inspector on 11 May 1984.[6] He became Chief Superintendent in 1997, Assistant Commissioner in 2003, senior assistant commissioner in 2007 and Deputy Commissioner in 2010. Having served in a wide range of operational duties, including the CID, Complaints Against Police, Service Quality, Personnel, Training, Information Systems, Finance, Policies Formulation, Planning and Development, Lee had been the Commander of Kowloon West Region, Assistant Commissioner (Crime) and Director of Crime and Security, and Deputy Commissioner (Management).[7]

During his tenure as a police officer, Lee obtained a master's degree in Public Policy and Administration from Charles Sturt University in Australia under a self-learning programme sponsored by the force.[7][8]

Security Bureau

Lee was appointed Under Secretary for Security in 2012 by chief executive Leung Chun-ying[7] and promoted to Secretary for Security in July 2017 in Carrie Lam's administration.

In 2019, Lee played a key role in the push for the 2019 Hong Kong extradition bill.[9]

On 3 July 2020, the Chinese state-run Xinhua News Agency stated that the Committee for Safeguarding National Security of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region was formally established. There were 10 members of the committee. As the Secretary for Security of Hong Kong, Lee was a member of the committee.[10][11]

In October 2020, Lee told Shenzhen Satellite TV in an interview that he was thankful for Beijing pushing through the National Security Law.[12]

In December 2020, Lee defended the freezing of bank accounts belonging to former Democratic Party legislator Ted Hui, and said that other bank accounts, including those of suspect's relatives, could be frozen if they were believed to be related to a crime.[13]

In January 2021, after the arrest of 53 pro-democracy figures, Lee stated to the Legislative Council that they were arrested for "subverting state power".[14] Lee also stated that "The Security Bureau strongly reaffirms and fully supports the Police's operation, which is resolute and professional."[15] In addition, Lee stated that the opposition figures' attempts were "evil" and meant to "overthrow" the government.[16]

On 15 January 2021, Lee said that the new National Security Law would include police surveillance of communications, potentially giving the police more power to intercept and read communications.[17]

In April 2021, Lee said that Hong Kong's disciplined services would adopt PLA-style goose step marching in order to demonstrate "nationalistic sentiments" and to "strengthen awareness of national security".[18] In July 2022, Lee as Chief Executive said that "This time, we've comprehensively adopted the Chinese-style marching, which fully reflects the police's national identity and sense of belonging to the country, and also represents a solemn commitment to the trust bestowed by the nation, and loyalty to the country".[19]

Chief Secretary

On 25 June 2021, the HKSAR Government announced that the State Council has on the recommendation of the Chief Executive appointed Lee as Chief Secretary for Administration,[20] making him the third former police officer after William Caine, the founding head of the Hong Kong Police Force who served as Colonial Secretary from 1846 to 1854, and Francis Henry May, Captain Superintendent of the Police Force from 1893 to 1901 and Colonial Secretary from 1902 to 1911, to have served in the second-highest governmental position in Hong Kong.

In January 2022, after the arrest of employees from Stand News, Lee said that US media groups should support law enforcement, claiming that "If you are genuinely interested in press freedom, you should support actions against people who have unlawfully exploited the media as a tool to pursue their political or personal gains".[21]

On 4 March 2022, Lee invoked emergency regulation to announce the construction of a bridge linking Hong Kong with Shenzhen; however, satellite images showed that construction appeared to have begun 5 days before Lee had invoked the emergency regulation.[22] The border is drawn at the halfway point in the Shenzhen River, and photos show that a barge was on the Hong Kong side on 27 February 2022.[22] On the day of the emergency regulation was announced, photos show that the bridge was past the halfway point on Hong Kong's side, extending just meters away from Hong Kong land.[22]

On 6 April 2022, Lee resigned and planned to join the 2022 Chief Executive election. His resignation was approved by the State Council of China on the following day.[23]

2022 Chief Executive election bid

Lee was the sole candidate who had the blessing of CCP leader Xi Jinping's central government in the 2022 Hong Kong Chief Executive election, communicated by the Liaison Office.[24][25] Lee formally announced his candidacy for the 2022 Hong Kong Chief Executive election on 9 April 2022[26] despite the Liaison Office having said that Lee would be the only candidate given permission by Beijing to be Chief Executive three days earlier.[27] Lee's campaign manager, Tam Yiu-chung, revealed that Lee would develop a political manifesto by the end of April.[28] Tam later claimed that the political manifesto would not be key for the public to support Lee.[29] Lee dismissed criticism that Election Committee members were nominating him without seeing his manifesto, claiming that the Election Committee members already knew him and could trust him.[30]

Despite having no competitors in the election, Lee said that the election run was "not easy".[31]

FactWire reported that Lee's two sons (Gilbert Lee and Jacky Lee) have business relationships with Election Committee members, but Lee said there was no conflict of interest.[32] In the report, FactWire said that Gilbert Lee's direct manager is Diana Ferreira Cesar, who sits on the finance subsector of the Election Committee. Additionally, Jacky Lee is a business partner of Li Sing-tui, an ex-officio member of the Election Committee.[33]

For Lee's election forum, seven media stations will cohost the broadcast, with one politician criticizing plans for it, stating that questions are restricted, with no audience member interaction, and the forum being pre-recorded rather than live.[34]

Lee will be the third Hong Kong leader with a police background, the others being William Caine and Sir Francis Henry May, who served as acting Governor and Governor of Hong Kong, respectively.

Lee violated the Election Ordinance by submitting late paperwork, but was exempted from penalty in August 2022.[35]

Press freedom

In April 2022, Lee said that there was no need to defend freedom of the press, claiming that it already exists.[36] In contrast, a poll done by the Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute (HKPORI) interviewed 1,004 people from April 2022 and showed that citizens' satisfaction with freedom of the press had dropped to a new record low.[36]

On 22 September 2022, Lee told "patriotic" journalists at an event to "deliver Hong Kong's latest developments and correct message."[37] Lee warned journalists to distance themselves from "bad elements" that "destroy press freedom", and also said freedom of speech and press were "adequately protected" by the Basic Law.[37] Lee also warned journalists to stay away from unnamed "camouflaged media", to which Ronson Chan, head of the Hong Kong Journalists Association, said "Making such a serious accusation without naming the organisations is not a responsible practice."[38]

A survey released on 23 September 2022 showed that faith in press freedom had dropped to a record low, with 93% of respondents citing the government as the source of suppression.[39]

In November 2022, after Bao Choy had her appeal rejected, Lee said press freedom was "in the pocket of the people of Hong Kong" and protected by the Basic Law.[40]

Housing

In June 2022, the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, the Beijing government's office that manages policy around Hong Kong, specifically said that it hoped Lee would tackle the deep-rooted issue of housing in Hong Kong, with more explicit targets, more courage, and more action.[41] On 1 July 2022, CCP general secretary Xi Jinping also made affordable housing a priority for Lee's government.[42] On 3 July 2022, Lee said that if the housing supply did not meet targets, both civil servants and government leaders would be responsible.[43]

Lee has said that he respected the plan to build public housing on parts of the Hong Kong Golf Club's site in Fanling.[44]

Appointment

Lee received the appointment from Chinese Premier Li Keqiang on 30 May 2022 and the cabinet he nominated was approved by the State Council of China on 19 June.[45][46] He was officially sworn in on the 1 July 2022. [47]

Lee was the sole approved candidate, and of 1,461 Election Committee voters, 8 rejected him, 4 cast blank ballots, and 33 did not vote.[48]

COVID-19 pandemic

On 5 July 2022 in his first ever weekly news conference as the Chief Executive, Lee said that Hong Kong would look into easing COVID-19 health protocols, shortening the quarantine period in particular. However, he also stressed the aim to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and hospitals from being overwhelmed. He also expressed his awareness for Hong Kong to remain open and convenient to travellers but the risks posed by the pandemic should also be taken into considerations at the same time. In addition, he revealed that he had instructed Secretary of Health Lo Chung-mau to consider the possibility of the move.[49]

On 1 September 2022, Lee announced after his videoconference that people would be allowed to "reverse quarantine" in Hong Kong for 7 days before traveling to Guangzhou.[50] Asked about quarantine-free travel to mainland China, Lee said "This proposal of doing quarantine in Hong Kong so as to fulfil the seven-plus-three requirement in Shenzhen is in no replacement of other measures that we always try to seek so as to allow more convenience in allowing people to travel from Hong Kong to the mainland."[50]

On 6 September 2022, Lee denied that government officials were in disagreement over pandemic measures with Bloomberg reporting that some officials hoped to end quarantine by November 2022.[51] On 12 September 2022, SCMP reported that Hong Kong's health experts had been issued clear rules by Lee's administration, stating that they should not express conflicting opinion's against the government's official positions.[52] This came after the government's COVID-19 Expert Advisory Panel, composed of six medical specialists, had several members who suggested gradually lifting COVID-19 restrictions, including removing hotel quarantine by November 2022.[52]

On 8 September 2022, Lee's administration announced that children as young as 5 years old would need to be vaccinated to eat in restaurants;[53] it is one of the few places in the world that requires vaccination for children.[54] A study released in October 2022 showed that 85% of parents in Hong Kong disagree with vaccinating their children.[55]

On 13 September 2022, Lee held a press conference, where he addressed concerns that people coming from mainland China to Hong Kong did not need to be vaccinated.[56] Lee stated that mainland China had few cases and did not pose a risk,[56] though Hong Kong averaged between 8,000 and 10,000 cases per day; Lee did not address the risk of unvaccinated mainland Chinese catching COVID-19 while in Hong Kong. A day later on 14 September 2022, lawmaker Michael Tien criticized the lack of mandatory vaccination for those coming from mainland China, saying that the lack of vaccination could increase their risk of infection in Hong Kong and place strain on the city's healthcare system.[57] Another doctor, Joseph Tsang Kay-yan, chairman of the Medical Association's advisory committee on communicable diseases, echoed Tien's comments against what Lee said, stating "The risk of travellers from the mainland getting Covid in Hong Kong is high. They need to balance this. If they are infected here, will they occupy our public healthcare system? Will it tighten the supply of isolation wards?"[58] On 16 September 2022, the government backtracked on Lee's statement and announced that arrivals from mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan would need to be vaccinated in order to receive a vaccine pass.[59]

Lee also vowed to host a "successful financial summit" in November 2022 (the Global Financial Leaders' Investment Summit) and that reducing quarantine would require more data.[60] During the press conference on 13 September 2022, Lee warned against comparing the flu against COVID-19, claiming that COVID-19 was 6 times more deadly than the flu, and stating that the situation was still "critical".[61] A day later, medical experts disagreed with Lee's data and estimated COVID-19's fatality rate at 0.098%, lower than the 0.1% recorded for the flu.[61] Dr. Joseph Tsang Kay-yan also mentioned that the death rate of 0.098% could be even lower in reality, due to citizens not reporting their infections, plus an accounting difference, where people who die with COVID-19 are counted as a COVID-19 death, even if the underlying cause of death was not due to COVID-19.[61]

In September 2022, the Hong Kong Association of Athletics Affiliates, organizer of the Standard Chartered Hong Kong Marathon 2022 issued an ultimatum to the government, stating that they would have to cancel the marathon if there were no government approval by 16 September 2022.[62] The date passed without government approval and the event was cancelled;[62] Lee later said "we feel disappointed that the organizer made the decision before the government's reply."[63]

On 20 September 2022, Huang Liuquan, an official at the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, made a speech which the Chinese Association of Hong Kong and Macau Studies interpreted as Beijing granting Lee permission to open Hong Kong's international borders.[64]

On 21 September 2022, Lee said that Hong Kong is a "highly open, international city in the Greater Bay Area", though SCMP noted that the region has been mostly cut off from the outside world since early 2020 due to travel restrictions.[65] Frederick Ma Si-hang, a former Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development, also called Hong Kong "isolated".[66]

On 23 September 2022, Lee said Hong Kong was still aligned with the "dynamic zero-Covid" strategy.[67] A day later, the Centre for Health Protection said Hong Kong is unlikely to achieve zero-Covid.[68]

On 1 October 2022, Lee said Hong Kong would not "lie flat" when fighting COVID-19.[69] On 8 October 2022, Lee said that differences of opinion should not detract from fighting the virus.[70]

On 11 October 2022, reporters pointed out that the third-jab rate in Hong Kong and Singapore were similar with Singapore having dropped many COVID-19 measures compared to Hong Kong,[71] but Lee said he would not compare anti-epidemic efforts between the two cities due to differences in healthcare systems and culture, and would continue to hold steady on Hong Kong's "0+3" scheme for inbound travelers.[72] Lee also said that removing all travel restrictions would first require the government to consider many "uncertain factors".[73]

On 18 October 2022, Lee said that the government should be careful when further easing COVID-19 restrictions, that a gradual approach was necessary, and that the government would be careful of new variants.[74] Lee also said that the government was working with mainland China to "iron out some challenges" in regards to quarantine-free cross-border travel, and said that details had not been hashed out, stating "I will have to wait for further ideas from our mainland counterparts so that we can really work out the details."[75]

On 20 October 2022, Lee was questioned by lawmaker Michael Tien on why his policy address "made no mention of the [proposed] 0+0 measure and a roadmap of returning to normalcy," with Tien also saying "You used a lot of paragraphs to talk about attracting talent, hosting large-scale exhibits and international events, but these rely on the number of overseas arrivals. And you know these people are most resistant to Hong Kong's anti-epidemic policies."[76]

On 21 October 2022, Lee was asked by citizens when the mask mandate would be over, with Lee responding that he would do so only if the child vaccination rate reached a satisfactory level, but did specify the numerical percentage.[77]

On 23 October 2022, after the High Court ruled that the government had no power to invalidate vaccine pass exemptions, Lee said "We just had a case in which the government was sued and lost. Hong Kong has no human rights? That's impossible!"[78] The government later changed the law after losing the case to give itself power to invalidate the vaccine passes.[78] On 1 November 2022, Lee was asked about whether changing the law rather than accepting the High Court's decision sent the wrong message about rule of law in Hong Kong, to which Lee said the question was misleading and that changing the law was "is in full compliance with the principle of the rule of law".[79]

On 1 November 2022, Lee said that under the "0+3" scheme, Hong Kong was "full of life".[80]

On 8 November 2022, Lee said that the mask mandate and vaccine pass health code system would be here to stay.[81] When asked about reducing the "0+3" policy to "0+0," Lee deflected and said that authorities are constantly reviewing its policies.[81]

On 15 November 2022, Lee said that people should not fixate on dropping restrictions, and that "Everyone has a different understanding of '0+0'. Therefore, I am not going to describe whether we are in [a stage] of "zero-plus-what"."[82] Respiratory expert Ho Pak-leung disagreed and said that the government should cancel restrictions and that "Two months since 0+3 came into place, the government has been offering piecemeal adjustments every Thursday - that's not opening up. The government should open up in one go."[82] On 19 December 2022, Ho again called for the government to cut all ineffective measures, such as testing and isolation.[83]

On 24 November 2022, SCMP released an editorial, stating "When Chief Executive John Lee Ka-chiu was freely enjoying the hospitality of Thailand during a visit to Bangkok over the weekend, members of a tour group from the country were having lunchboxes in their hotel rooms in Hong Kong" due to government restrictions in Hong Kong.[84]

In December 2022, a month after Lee told the public to forget about "0+0," Lee was given the "green light" by Beijing to move the city to "0+0" and did so as soon as he had the permission by Beijing to do so.[85] Lee did not consult the Command and Coordination Group that he earlier created, before making the decision.[85] David Hui Shu-cheong, a member of the group, said that the group had not met for months, and that the sudden relaxation of restrictions could add pressure to the local healthcare system.[86] On 28 December 2022, after dropping some pandemic restrictions, Lee said that "In fact, I think society as a whole is preparing because I have been hearing a lot of voices saying this is the thing to be done."[87]

In January 2023, Lee said that he opposed an independent investigation into the government's handling of the pandemic, an idea supported by health experts.[88] Lee noted that Singapore had around 1,700 deaths from the virus, much fewer than Hong Kong's approximately 13,000 deaths.[89]

Mainland China border

Lee has met with mainland Chinese authorities multiple times to discuss COVID-19 and reopening the Hong Kong - mainland China border without quarantine, both as Chief Secretary and Chief Executive. In September 2021, he led a delegation to Shenzhen for a meeting.[90] He did so again in November 2021,[91] and again in February 2022.[92] In August 2022, Lee said that he has had "good dialogue" on fully reopening the border, without providing an estimate on when the border would be opened.[93] In August 2022, Lee was scheduled for another meeting with authorities in mainland China, but did not elaborate on the reopening plan or timetable, saying that "It is better to announce the details when we have reached a certain stage of agreement, otherwise the information will be confusing."[94] Lee cancelled his physical trip on 31 August 2022 and opted for a videoconference instead, and said "We will discuss the cross-border arrangement for residents in Hong Kong and mainland China and I hope that, after thorough discussion, a consensus can be reached."[95] Lee also said "Of course, during our discussion, we will weigh out different options" and "we will actively consider any options".[96] In December 2022, Lee said that talks with mainland authorities on quarantine-free travel had recently restarted again.[97] SCMP reported that in December 2022, Lee would go to Beijing to further discuss the quarantine-free reopening of the border with mainland China.[98]

In December 2022, Lee said that "I can now announce that the much-awaited reopening of the border with the mainland can now be achieved" in January 2023, though Tam Yiu-chung warned that it would be opened in a gradual manner and not fully.[99] On 8 January 2023, Lee said that he would strive for a full reopening of the border, without a quota.[100]

As part of border reopening plans, those from overseas are required to be vaccinated against COVID-19, but those from mainland China will not be required to be vaccinated.[101] Medical experts Ho Pak-leung and Leung Chi-chiu both disagreed with the vaccination exemption and suggested that those coming from mainland China should be vaccinated as a condition to enter Hong Kong, to prevent the local healthcare system from being overloaded.[102] Lawmaker Michael Tien also said that unvaccinated mainland visitors "would actually increase congestion in terms of the availability of beds in our public hospitals."[103]

In January 2023, a government spokesperson said that all travelers from Hong Kong to mainland China would need a PCR test, including children and babies; however, children under 3 years old traveling from mainland China to Hong Kong would not need the PCR test.[104] Lee said he "will communicate" with mainland authorities on the discrepancy.[105]

Paul Chan

On 1 November 2022, Chief Executive John Lee said that Financial Secretary Paul Chan would have to take a PCR test upon arrival in Hong Kong, and will have to isolate if he tests positive; Lee stressed that Chan would not be allowed any exemptions.[106] On 2 November 2022, SCMP reported that Chan tested positive with his PCR test, but did not have to isolate, contradicting Lee's earlier remarks.[107]

National education

In July 2022, Lee said that the government would spare no effort to enhance patriotic education, and said that national identity and nationalism would need to be fostered to students from an early age.[108] In August 2022, Lee said that schools must teach students to respect and safeguard national security.[109] In September 2022, Lee said that teachers would be required to "be cautious" about their conduct, set a "sense of national identity" with students, and also emphasized that "Newly appointed teachers in all public sector schools will be required to pass the Basic Law Test."[110]

Taiwan

In August 2022, after Nancy Pelosi visited Taiwan, Lee said "According to media reports, when Nancy Pelosi was in Taiwan, she ignored the successful implementation of One Country, Two Systems in Hong Kong and maliciously criticised Hong Kong's democracy and freedom."[111] Later, Lee endorsed a document Beijing published called "The Taiwan Question and China's Reunification in the New Era".[112] Lee and other government officials were criticized by Lew Mon-hung for "crossing the line" with his statements on Taiwan, as the Basic Law stipulates that diplomatic affairs of Hong Kong are to be handled by mainland China's Foreign Ministry.[113][114]

Press briefings

According to analysis of government press releases, Lee did not hold a press conference for 7 straight weeks, the longest break of any Chief Executive in more than 10 years.[115]

Policy address

On 1 October 2022, Lee said that Xi Jinping's speech on 1 July 2022 would provide the blueprint for his cabinet's governance.[69]

During his election campaign, Lee promised to release "key performance indicators" and initial ideas on alleviating public housing wait times within his first 100 days in office.[54] On 8 October 2022, the first 100 days had been reached,[116] and Lee had not yet made public announcements on either promise.[54]

A survey released beforehand showed that 49% of people had no-to-low expectations for Lee's policy address.[117] After his policy address, Lee's satisfaction rate for the address was 33.7%, the lowest out of all maiden speeches given by Chief Executives in Hong Kong.[118]

On 19 October 2022, Lee's policy address included measures to prohibit insulting the flag of Hong Kong,[119] update the Civil Service so that employees practice the principle of "patriots administering Hong Kong",[120] fund HK$60m in "national education" for kindergartens,[121] and conduct a review on District Councils so that they follow the "patriots-only" principle.[122] When speaking about the Civil Service, Lee said that "There are a number of black sheep in our civil servant force that should be excluded."[123]

Lee also pledged to build 30,000 Light Public Housing (LPH) units within the next 5 years, units meant for temporary stays of around 5 years and not meant as a long-term solution, unlike traditional public housing.[124] Lee also said he would aim to reduce the wait for public housing from 6 years to 4.5 years within the next 4 years, using a new composite index that would track both LPH and traditional public housing wait times.[124][125] The Democratic Party warned that the traditional public housing wait times would not be decreased with the introduction of LPH units,[126] and also said that the government was "playing with words and maths" since LPH tenants would still have to be relocated to traditional public housing at the end of their leases.[127] A member of the Liber Research Community also questioned the new metric and temporary housing, stating "Light Public Housing will increase the number of public flats and the wait may seem shorter. But these are just transitional housing supply and it is not "real" public housing."[128] Lawmaker Tik Chi-yuen also raised similar concerns, saying that "So this does not achieve the ultimate aim [of obtaining public housing]. You are just moving people from one place to another. It is just buying time."[127] Lee later said that the LPH and composite index were not meant to "dress up" and lower waiting time statistics.[118] The Housing Authority recommended that the goal for wait times should be 3 years rather than the 4.5 set by Lee.[76] A day after the policy address, officials later admitted that the LPH scheme was created because there was a failure to boost public housing in the next 5 years.[129] The LPH scheme incurred questions from citizens and netizens, saying that the 30,000 units were making up public housing supply numbers.[130] An editorial by SCMP also mentioned criticism of the playing with numbers.[131]

On 20 October 2022, Lee participated in a phone-in session with radio stations, where one caller addressed "harsh policies", stating "Hong Kong's always had a lot of talents. It was until the unrest that made people leave. Why are talents leaving? We all know full well. It's not about studying elsewhere or whatever. It's because harsh policies are stronger than tigers... We love freedom in a metropolis like Hong Kong. And we love China, but I dare say it doesn't love us. Japan, the US and the UK all let us in freely. Why are there so many rules [for entering the mainland]? Chief Executive, you know full well, you just wouldn't accept it."[132]

On 23 October 2022, Lee defended Secretary for Labour and Welfare Chris Sun, who criticized a cartoonist that made fun of Lee's plans to attract talent to move to Hong Kong.[133]

Public hospitals

In his policy address, Lee said that the government may implement a minimum period of time in which healthcare professionals must work at a public hospital before they can leave.[134] This caused an uproar among healthcare professionals, according to the president of the Hong Kong Public Doctors' Association.[134]

In November 2022, Lee said of the policy "I believe the professionals hold strong affection for Hong Kong and are willing to serve the society."[135] In contrast, John Tsang said that the policy "will only lead more medical professionals to leave Hong Kong."[135]

On 11 November 2022, Health Secretary Lo Chung-mau revealed that the plan would include doctors, nurses, and dentists.[136]

CBD

In September 2022, Lee said that "Cannabis is a drug, and the government will categorise CBD as a dangerous drug... to protect the public's health."[137] The move to ban CBD by February 2023 would put it in the same category as heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine.[137]

Emigration wave

In January 2022, Hong Kong Free Press reported on Hong Kong's mass exodus of people, citing statistics from school vacancies, BN(O) visa applications, and early withdrawals from MPF accounts.[138]

In September 2022, official data showed that 113,000 people left Hong Kong in the last year, with some former residents citing COVID-19 restrictions and the national security law as reasons for leaving.[139] The decrease in Hong Kong's total population was 1.6% from a year earlier, the largest drop since record keeping started in 1961.[139]

In his October 2022 policy address, Lee said that around 140,000 people had left the Hong Kong workforce in the last 2 years, and that about 66% of them were in managerial or higher-end pay grades and were classified as "highly skilled", with about 50% of the 140,000 people between the ages of 25-39.[140][141] Of the 140,000 people, about 116,600 of them, or 83%, were aged 18 to 39.[142] Lee previously rejected the use of the term "emigration wave" when describing the change in population.[143]

CUHK released a survey in October 2022, showing that 28.4% of people would emigrate overseas if they had the chance.[144] 16.5% cited "excessive political disputes/unstable politics," 15% cited "collapsing liberty, human rights or freedom of information",, 13.4% cited "undemocratic political system/waning democracy/no more democratic elections," and 13.1% cited "dismal economic situation/overcast economic future" as the primary reason for leaving.[144]

In November 2022, statistics released by the Immigration Department showed that 13,800 general employment visas were granted to overseas workers in 2021, compared to 41,000 in 2019.[145] In addition, for workers coming from mainland China under the Admission Scheme for Mainland Talents and Professionals program, about 9,000 visas were granted in 2021, a 35% drop compared to 2019.[145]

From January 2021 to June 2022, 133,124 Hong Kongers were approved for the British National Overseas visa program, allowing them a path to citizenship in the UK.[146] As of February 2023, around 144,500 people had moved from Hong Kong to the UK using the the BN(O) program in two years.[147]

Collusion

On 20 October, Lee said "First, the so-called "collusion" mentioned in the question just now is a term used to stir up social conflict during the period of anti-China strife [反中亂港] in Hong Kong, and we have to oppose such destructive discourse of sowing dissension and stirring up conflicts... "Collusion" between X and Y mentioned earlier [by Ambrose Lam] is a deliberate attempt to create social division and contradictions."[148] According to Lee, there is an association between collusion with anti-government protest, whereas some government projects, such as Cyberport, were awarded to a single developer and created complaints of collusion.[148]

Transportation

In his 2022 Chief Executive Policy Address, Lee announced the Government would prioritise three rail projects and three road projects to improve transport infrastructure and connectivity in Hong Kong. It was reported that all six of these projects would begin consultation later in the year.[149]

The Tseung Kwan O line would extend southwards to the New Development Area of Tseung Kwan O Area 137. As part of the development of Area 137, a new road tunnel would be built from Tseung Kwan O to Yau Tong. In addition, he recommended the construction of Hong Kong‑Shenzhen Western Rail Link, a railway line connecting Hung Shui Kiu to Qianhai, Shenzhen, and the Central Rail Link between Kam Tin and Kowloon Tong via Kwai Chung. [150][151]

A new highway, the Northern Metropolis Highway, would improve connectivity between Tin Shui Wai and Kwu Tung North increasing road capacity between the Northern Metropolis. A new trunk road between Tai Po and Kowloon West would bypass Sha Tin and relieve congestion from the Tolo Highway.[149]

Glory to Hong Kong

In November 2022, Glory to Hong Kong was played during a rugby match in Incheon, between the Hong Kong and South Korea rugby teams.[152] Lee said that the "song that was played was closely connected to the 2019 violence and disturbances, and advocacy for Hong Kong's independence," and said that the Organised Crime and Triad Bureau would investigate the matter.[152] In December 2022, Lee said that he would ask Google to remove the song from search results when querying for the national anthem of Hong Kong.[153] After Google denied the request, Lee said that there was a legal basis for Google to do so.[154]

Jimmy Lai

After the Department of Justice lost multiple appeals in an attempt to block Jimmy Lai from hiring Tim Owen as his lawyer, Lee said that he would ask Beijing's National People's Congress Standing Committee (NPCSC) to interpret the national security law to potentially disallow the hiring of foreign lawyers in national security cases.[155] Earlier, three Court of Final Appeal judges, including Chief Justice Andrew Cheung had ruled that Lai be allowed to hire Owen.[156] Lee dismissed concerns that his move to ask the NPCSC to rule in the matter would damage the city's legal reputation, but professor Johannes Chan Man-mun, former law dean of HKU, said that the NPCSC interpretation "may severely compromise Hong Kong as an international city."[157]

Lee also said "The most appropriate way forward is for the NPCSC to issue an interpretation and the case is handled accordingly. This is the approach that is in the best interest of this case and our legal system."[158] When asked about if the decision to get the NPCSC involved would be unfair to Lai, Lee did not comment.[159]

On 28 December 2022, Lee thanked Beijing for including the NCPSC interpretation on their next meeting's agenda.[160] On 30 December 2022, the NPCSC ruled that the Chief Executive now has permission to decide whether or not defendants could hire foreign lawyers; Lee welcomed the ruling and said that foreign lawyers could be a threat due to them coming from "hostile" countries.[161]

In January 2023, Lee said that the Committee for Safeguarding National Security, a committee he chairs, supported changing local laws to potentially ban foreign lawyers from national security cases.[162]

Article 23

On 12 April 2022, Lee stated that implementing security legislation under Article 23 of the Basic Law would be a top priority for him.[163] Lee later said in July 2022 that he preferred not to rush the law, which some saw as backtracking on his election pledge.[164] The legislation was put on the back burner and was not scheduled for Legislative Council discussion in 2022.[164]

In January 2023, after meeting with Xia Baolong, who asked that the Lee administration revise local legislation to keep it aligned with the national security law, Lee said that he would once again prioritize legislation under Article 23 as soon as possible.[162]

On 17 January 2023, Lee said that the legislation would cover spying and people pretending to be journalists, who produce "fake news."[165] Lee also said that the government would prevent "foreign agents" from entering the city, but did not specify how.[166]

Personal life

Lee's wife and two children hold U.K. citizenship, and therefore Lee is eligible to claim U.K. citizenship as well.[167] Lee himself had U.K. citizenship until 2012, when he relinquished it in order to take the Under Secretary for Security position.[168]

Lee married his wife, Janet Lam Lai-sim, after their elder son, Gilbert Lee Man-lung, was born.[169] Both Gilbert Lee and the younger son, Jacky Lee Man-chun, attended Wah Yan College.[169] In June 1990, John was nominated by then-12-years-old son and won the "Top 10 Modern Fathers".[170]

Lee was awarded the Silver Bauhinia Star by the Hong Kong SAR Government in 2017.[171]

In 2021, Lee had surgery to remove plane warts from his neck.[172]

He has a domestic helper, who in February 2022, tested positive for COVID-19.[173]

When asked in April 2022, Lee did not respond to questions on whether he is Catholic.[169] The following month, he said that he is Catholic.[174]

He is nicknamed "Pikachu" by the Hong Kong anti-establishment faction, as it sounds similar to his Cantonese name "Lee Ka-chiu".[175]

According to his August 2022 declaration of interests, Lee is a "Distinguished Member" of the Hong Kong Club.[176]

COVID-19 infection

In November 2021, Lee had his 3rd dose of the Sinovac vaccine.[177] In November 2022, Lee's spokesman said that Lee had tested negative on RAT tests, but positive on a PCR test upon landing in Hong Kong.[178] The statement did not mention if Lee had symptoms or not.[178] Lee was given antiviral drugs, and two members of Lee's entourage, Carol Yip, Director of the Chief Executive's Office, and Priscilla To, Lee’s private secretary, were deemed close contacts.[179]

United States

In August 2020, Lee and ten other officials were sanctioned by the United States Department of the Treasury under Executive Order 13936 by President Trump for undermining Hong Kong's autonomy.[180][181][182] He owns a flat at King's Park Villa in Ho Man Tin, bought in 1997 for HK $12.5 million and fully paid off, eliminating possible issues from his bank and the US sanctions.[183]

On 14 October 2020, Lee was listed on a United States Department of State report as one of 10 individuals who materially contributed to the failure of China to meet its obligations under the Sino–British Joint Declaration and Hong Kong's Basic Law.[184]

On 20 April 2022, Lee's YouTube account for his Chief Executive bid, johnlee2022, was removed by Google as they justified that "the move was required by US sanctions" against the ex-security chief. His Facebook and Instagram pages were still functional, but their payment feature was disabled by Meta, who operates the two social media platforms, for reasons similar to Google's. The suspension of Lee's YouTube account was condemned by Foreign Ministry of China spokesperson Wang Wenbin, who accused "certain US companies" of being "political tools" for the U.S. government.[185][186]

In October 2022, Lee said of the US sanctions that "It is a very barbaric act and I am not going to comment on the effect of such barbaric act" and "We will just laugh off the so-called sanctions."[187]

European Union

The European Parliament began the examination in June 2022 whether Lee is set to be sanctioned under the Magnitsky Act.[188]

References

  1. "Profile: John Lee, HKSAR's sixth-term chief executive designate". Xinhua News. 8 May 2022. Archived from the original on 8 August 2022. Retrieved 8 August 2022.
  2. Leung, Hillary; Grundy, Tom; Ho, Kelly; Li, Almond (8 May 2022). "Breaking: Sole candidate John Lee selected as Hong Kong's next leader". Hong Kong Free Press. Archived from the original on 15 May 2022. Retrieved 8 May 2022.
  3. "John Lee: Who is Hong Kong's new hardline pro-Beijing leader?". BBC News. 1 July 2022. Archived from the original on 9 May 2022. Retrieved 8 August 2022.
  4. Lau, Chris; Cheung, Gary (8 May 2022). "Who is John Lee? Former schoolmates, teachers and colleagues give their measure of the man set to be Hong Kong's next leader". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 17 June 2022. Retrieved 17 June 2022.
  5. Lau, Chris (10 April 2022). "'Big brother Chiu' for Hong Kong chief executive? John Lee's classmates not surprised their policeman friend is running for top job". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 5 May 2022. Retrieved 5 May 2022.
  6. HK Government Staff List 1985
  7. "Three Under Secretaries and Two Political Assistants Appointed" (Press release). Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. 12 September 2012. Archived from the original on 1 November 2018. Retrieved 2 August 2020.
  8. Wong, Natalie (26 June 2021). "Hong Kong cabinet reshuffle: new No 2 official John Lee dismisses concerns over policy experience, cites superior grasp of government work". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 27 June 2021. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  9. "John Lee resigns, paving way for Chief Executive bid". The Standard. 6 April 2022. Archived from the original on 6 April 2022. Retrieved 6 April 2022.
  10. Liu, Mingyang (3 July 2020). "香港特区国安委正式成立 林郑月娥担任主席" [The Committee for Safeguarding National Security of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region is formally established with Carrie Lam as chairman]. Xinhua News (in Simplified Chinese). Archived from the original on 8 April 2020. Retrieved 8 August 2020.
  11. "香港特区国安委举行首次会议" [The Committee for Safeguarding National Security of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region convenes for the first time] (in Simplified Chinese). Xinhua News. 6 July 2020. Archived from the original on 8 August 2020.
  12. "Hong Kong security chief thanks Beijing for new power to crush separatists". Apple Daily (in Chinese (Hong Kong)). Archived from the original on 4 July 2021. Retrieved 12 October 2020.
  13. Pyne, Richard (10 December 2020). "No politics behind bank account freezing: John Lee". RTHK. Archived from the original on 10 December 2020. Retrieved 21 February 2021.
  14. Lau, Jessie (6 January 2021). "Hong Kong Police Arrest 53 Pro-Democrats on Subversion Charges". The Diplomat. Archived from the original on 20 January 2021. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  15. "HKSAR Government will not tolerate any offence of subversion" (Press release). Government of Hong Kong. 6 January 2021. Archived from the original on 27 January 2021. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  16. Low, Zoe (6 January 2021). "What sparked Hong Kong's biggest mass arrests under national security law?". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 25 April 2021. Retrieved 7 January 2021.
  17. "HK security chief says communications surveillance can come under security law". Reuters. Hong Kong. 15 January 2021. Archived from the original on 3 January 2022. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  18. "Police goose step for public to show off nationalism". RTHK. 15 April 2021. Archived from the original on 15 April 2021. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  19. "Police become guardians of security, stability: CE". RTHK. 9 July 2022. Archived from the original on 9 July 2022. Retrieved 9 July 2022.
  20. Cheng, Selina (25 June 2021). "Security chief John Lee to become Hong Kong's no. 2; police chief to head up security". Hong Kong Free Press. Archived from the original on 4 July 2021. Retrieved 25 June 2021.
  21. "Wall Street Journal should support arrests in Hong Kong: John Lee". The Standard HK. 3 January 2022. Archived from the original on 3 January 2022. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  22. Cheng, Selina (3 April 2022). "Covid-19: Work on temporary China-Hong Kong bridge began before emergency law was invoked, satellite images show". Hong Kong Free Press. Archived from the original on 15 May 2022. Retrieved 3 April 2022.
  23. Cheung, Tony; Cheng, Lilian; Lau, Chris (8 April 2022). "Hong Kong chief executive election 2022: Beijing approves resignation of John Lee, clearing way for his leadership bid". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 8 April 2022. Retrieved 8 April 2022.
  24. Chia, Krystal (6 April 2022). "China Backs Former Security Chief to Lead Hong Kong, SCMP Says". Bloomberg News. BNN Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 30 April 2022. Retrieved 20 April 2022.
  25. Feng, Venus (18 April 2022). "Hong Kong Confirms John Lee as Sole Chief Executive Candidate". Bloomberg News. BNN Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 20 April 2022. Retrieved 20 April 2022.
  26. Cheung, Tony (10 April 2022). "Hong Kong chief executive election 2022: Why did hopeful John Lee keep talking about "result-oriented" approach to governing?". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 10 April 2022. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  27. Cheng, Lilian; Wong, Natalie; Lau, Chris (6 April 2022). "Hong Kong chief executive election 2022: No 2 official John Lee formally resigns, paving way for bid as Beijing's preferred candidate". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 10 April 2022. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  28. Wong, Natalie; Ng, Kang-chung; Lam, Nadia (10 April 2022). "Hong Kong chief executive election 2022: John Lee secures enough nominations to run as more political heavyweights pledge support". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 10 April 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  29. "Manifesto not key for people to support John Lee: Tam". RTHK. 11 April 2022. Archived from the original on 11 April 2022. Retrieved 11 April 2022.
  30. Lam, Nadia; Cheng, Lilian (11 April 2022). "Hong Kong chief executive election 2022: John Lee says no need to revisit extradition bill, as he focuses on "sense of gain" for public". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 11 April 2022. Retrieved 11 April 2022.
  31. Leung, Hillary (13 April 2022). "Hong Kong's John Lee secures leadership bid; says run "not easy" despite being sole contender so far". Hong Kong Free Press. Archived from the original on 15 May 2022. Retrieved 13 April 2022.
  32. "John Lee dismisses idea of conflict of interest". RTHK. 14 April 2022. Archived from the original on 14 April 2022. Retrieved 14 April 2022.
  33. "FactWire: John Lee's sons have business links with Hong Kong chief executive electors, investigation reveals". FactWire. Hong Kong Free Press. 15 April 2022. Archived from the original on 15 May 2022. Retrieved 15 April 2022.
  34. Shum, Michael (26 April 2022). "Lee to hold court in one-man broadcast". The Standard. Archived from the original on 26 April 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  35. "John Lee exempted from penalty after the Election Ordinance violation". The Standard. Archived from the original on 18 August 2022. Retrieved 18 August 2022.
  36. "No need to "defend" press freedom "because it exists", Hong Kong leadership candidate John Lee says". Hong Kong Free Press. 25 April 2022. Archived from the original on 15 May 2022. Retrieved 25 April 2022.
  37. Chau, Candice (23 September 2022) [2022-09-22]. "John Lee tells "patriotic" journalists to deliver the "right Hong Kong message" at media event for China's National Day". Hong Kong Free Press. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  38. Lam, Nadia (22 September 2022). "Hong Kong's leader urges journalists to stay away from "camouflaged media"". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 22 September 2022. Retrieved 22 September 2022.
  39. "Faith in Hong Kong press freedom sinks to record low: survey". The Standard. Archived from the original on 23 September 2022. Retrieved 23 September 2022.
  40. Chau, Candice (8 November 2022). "Hong Kong's largest press group "disappointed and worried" over Bao Choy appeal ruling". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  41. "Beijing says new SAR government must tackle problems". RTHK. 19 June 2022. Archived from the original on 19 June 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  42. "Xi calls on HK's new administration to build bigger homes". The Standard. 1 July 2022. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 1 July 2022.
  43. "HK leaders tasked with meeting housing goal: John Lee". The Standard. 3 July 2022. Archived from the original on 3 July 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  44. Dong, Joy (30 January 2023). "Golf Course or Housing? A Patch of Green Divides Hong Kong". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 31 January 2023.
  45. "John Lee receives CE appointment letter in Beijing". RTHK. 30 May 2022. Archived from the original on 16 June 2022. Retrieved 16 June 2022.
  46. "Principal Officials of Sixth-term HKSAR Government appointed (with photos)" (Press release). Government of Hong Kong. 19 June 2022. Archived from the original on 27 August 2022. Retrieved 20 June 2022.
  47. "LIVE: Chinese President Xi Jinping swears in new Hong Kong CE John Lee". South China Morning Post. 1 July 2022. Archived from the original on 1 July 2022. Retrieved 1 July 2022 via YouTube.
  48. "Hong Kong leadership race: 8 voters say "no" to John Lee and 4 cast blank ballots". South China Morning Post. 8 May 2022. Archived from the original on 18 August 2022. Retrieved 18 August 2022.
  49. "Hong Kong considers shorter COVID-19 quarantine for travellers: John Lee". CNA. Hong Kong. 5 July 2022. Archived from the original on 5 July 2022. Retrieved 5 July 2022.
  50. "Mainland-bound travellers to be quarantined in HK". RTHK. 1 September 2022. Archived from the original on 1 September 2022. Retrieved 1 September 2022.
  51. Cheng, Lilian; Lam, Jeffie (6 September 2022). "Covid-19: No decision made on further easing of Hong Kong hotel quarantine rules, leader John Lee says". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 17 September 2022.
  52. Wong, Natalie; Cheng, Lilian (12 September 2022). "Dangerous "one-tone approach" or a clear and centralised Covid policy? Unpacking why Hong Kong's health experts have been told to keep mum". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 15 September 2022. Retrieved 15 September 2022.
  53. "Government lowers applicable age of Vaccine Pass to 5 and adjusts vaccination requirements applicable to persons aged 12 or above" (Press release). Government of Hong Kong. 8 September 2022. Retrieved 8 October 2022.
  54. Chau, Candice (8 October 2022). "Explainer: Hong Kong Chief Executive John Lee's first 100 days in office". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 8 October 2022.
  55. "Eighty-five pc of parents oppose vaccinating their kids: survey". The Standard. 11 October 2022. Retrieved 11 October 2022.
  56. "John Lee hopes "reverse quarantine" to function in the long run". The Standard. 13 September 2022. Archived from the original on 13 September 2022. Retrieved 13 September 2022.
  57. "Provisional vaccine passes for unjabbed travelers ironic, says Michael Tien". The Standard. Archived from the original on 14 September 2022. Retrieved 14 September 2022.
  58. Yeo, Rachel; Lam, Nadia (14 September 2022). "Hong Kong "to review rules" on provisional Covid vaccine passes for travellers". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 15 September 2022.
  59. Ting, Victor; Sun, Fiona (16 September 2022). "Mainland Chinese to follow same vaccine pass rules as other arrivals in Hong Kong". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 16 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  60. Lau, Chris; Lam, Nadia (13 September 2022). "Coronavirus: Hong Kong leader dismisses talk city's financial and tech summit will flounder despite Singapore hosting fintech event at same time". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 13 September 2022. Retrieved 13 September 2022.
  61. ting, Victor; Heung, Sammy (15 September 2022). "Coronavirus: row erupts over whether Covid is deadlier than flu, as Hong Kong's health chief accuses experts of misleading public into thinking both are similar". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 15 September 2022. Retrieved 15 September 2022.
  62. "HK Marathon 2022 canceled as no official approval received yet". The Standard. 16 September 2022. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 20 September 2022.
  63. "HK Marathon to be held on February 12: Athlete Association". The Standard. 20 September 2022. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 20 September 2022.
  64. Wong, Natalie; Cheung, Tony; Cheng, Lilian (20 September 2022). "Coronavirus: Beijing backs Hong Kong leader's changes to travel rules, says opening up to nation and rest of world can happen at same time". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 20 September 2022.
  65. Wong, Natalie (21 September 2022). "Hong Kong's John Lee vows to retain global connectivity, bank on strengths as "open, international city" to drive growth in Greater Bay Area". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 21 September 2022. Retrieved 21 September 2022.
  66. "HK to lose international financial center status amid Covid: expert warns". The Standard. 22 September 2022. Archived from the original on 22 September 2022. Retrieved 22 September 2022.
  67. Heung, Sammy (23 September 2022). "Coronavirus: Hong Kong is finally axing hotel quarantine for arrivals – here's what you need to know". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 23 September 2022. Retrieved 23 September 2022.
  68. "Hong Kong unlikely to achieve zero Covid: CHP". RTHK. 24 September 2022. Archived from the original on 24 September 2022. Retrieved 24 September 2022.
  69. "John Lee vows better public services as HK celebrates National Day". The Standard. 1 October 2022. Archived from the original on 1 October 2022. Retrieved 1 October 2022.
  70. "CE marks 100 days with caution on easing Covid rules". RTHK. 8 October 2022. Archived from the original on 8 October 2022. Retrieved 8 October 2022.
  71. "All COVID-19 vaccination-differentiated measures to be lifted from Oct 10: MOH". CNA. Singapore. 7 October 2022. Archived from the original on 31 October 2022. Retrieved 11 October 2022.
  72. "City to hold steady on easing of quarantine rules as imported cases climb: John Lee". The Standard. 11 October 2022. Archived from the original on 21 October 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  73. Lee, Peter (12 October 2022). "Covid-19: Many "uncertain factors" to consider before axing all travel restrictions, John Lee says". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 12 October 2022.
  74. "Proceed with caution on further easing of Covid rules as imported cases rise; John Lee". The Standard. 18 October 2022. Archived from the original on 23 October 2022. Retrieved 18 October 2022.
  75. Lau, Chris; Lam, Jeffie; Ting, Victor (18 October 2022). "Hong Kong 'set to ease Covid cap on public gatherings from 4 to 12'". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 1 November 2022. Retrieved 18 October 2022.
  76. Li, Almond (20 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: John Lee urged to set timetable for further Covid relaxations, and local security law". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 20 October 2022.
  77. "Hong Kong to consider lifting mask mandate on one condition". The Standard. 21 October 2022. Archived from the original on 21 October 2022. Retrieved 21 October 2022.
  78. Chau, Candice (26 October 2022). "Hong Kong falls from top 20 in global rule of law Index". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 26 October 2022.
  79. "CE: govt right to change law on jab exemptions". RTHK. 1 November 2022. Archived from the original on 1 November 2022. Retrieved 1 November 2022.
  80. "Hong Kong full of life under '0+3' scheme, says John Lee". The Standard. 1 November 2022. Archived from the original on 1 November 2022. Retrieved 1 November 2022.
  81. Standard, The. "Mask mandate, two-color health code here to stay, says John Lee". The Standard. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  82. "Don't be fixated on '0+0', Hong Kong leader John Lee says". South China Morning Post. 15 November 2022. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  83. Lee, Peter (20 December 2022). "Hong Kong should axe 'ineffective' Covid-19 measures like testing and isolation, health expert says". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 20 December 2022.
  84. "Hong Kong lunchbox experience of visitors says it all". South China Morning Post. 24 November 2022. Retrieved 24 November 2022.
  85. "What explains Hong Kong's sudden switch to a '0+0' Covid scheme?". South China Morning Post. 15 December 2022. Retrieved 15 December 2022.
  86. "Hong Kong to drop on-arrival Covid PCR tests, vaccine pass from Thursday". South China Morning Post. 28 December 2022. Retrieved 28 December 2022.
  87. "Vaccine pass abandoned as HK drops many Covid curbs - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 28 December 2022.
  88. Leung, Hillary (31 January 2023). "Hong Kong's John Lee opposes investigation into gov't Covid response; masks to stay until after 'winter surge'". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 31 January 2023.
  89. "Hong Kong leader dismisses calls for independent review of pandemic handling". South China Morning Post. 31 January 2023. Retrieved 31 January 2023.
  90. "CS leads delegation to attend meeting on Mainland and Hong Kong anti-epidemic work". Government of Hong Kong (Press release). 25 September 2021. Archived from the original on 17 August 2022. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  91. "CS leads delegation to attend second meeting on Mainland and Hong Kong anti-epidemic work". Government of Hong Kong (Press release). 24 November 2021. Archived from the original on 17 August 2022. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  92. Cheng, Selina (11 February 2022). "Covid-19: Top Hong Kong officials to meet mainland authorities on Sat to discuss aid & import assurances". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  93. Wong, Natalie; Liu, Oscar (17 August 2022). "Hong Kong, mainland China working together to reopen border, John Lee says as he stresses aim to reduce travel fuss without increasing Covid risks". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 17 August 2022. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  94. Wong, Natalie; Liu, Oscar (27 August 2022). "Coronavirus: Hong Kong leader John Lee to pursue reopening of border with mainland China on Guangdong trip". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 27 August 2022. Retrieved 27 August 2022.
  95. "Hong Kong's John Lee cancels mainland China visit amid worsening Covid-19 situation both sides of border". AFP. Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. 31 August 2022. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 31 August 2022.
  96. "John Lee cancels Guangdong visit, meets mainland officials online". The Standard. Archived from the original on 31 August 2022. Retrieved 31 August 2022.
  97. "Hong Kong leader upbeat on quarantine-free travel to mainland next year". South China Morning Post. 10 December 2022. Retrieved 10 December 2022.
  98. "'Border reopening talks on agenda' for Hong Kong leader's first duty visit to Beijing". South China Morning Post. 19 December 2022. Retrieved 19 December 2022.
  99. "Hong Kong aims to finish plan to reopen mainland border by mid-January: leader". South China Morning Post. 24 December 2022. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  100. "HK to push for full resumption of mainland travel: CE - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 8 January 2023.
  101. "Hong Kong is lifting Covid curbs big time. Here are travel must-knows". South China Morning Post. 28 December 2022. Retrieved 28 December 2022.
  102. "Hong Kong-mainland China border 'to reopen earliest January 10'". South China Morning Post. 28 December 2022. Retrieved 28 December 2022.
  103. "Travel industry ramps up as quota bookings begin - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 6 January 2023.
  104. "All children need PCR tests for mainland travel: govt - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 10 January 2023.
  105. Chau, Candice (10 January 2023). "Children under 3 must take Covid test to enter mainland China, Hong Kong says". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 10 January 2023.
  106. Lau, Chris; Cheung, Tony (1 November 2022). "Hong Kong leader shrugs off absence of 3 top bankers from financial summit". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 3 November 2022. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  107. Heung, Sammy; Wong, Natalie (2 November 2022). "Hong Kong finance chief Paul Chan denies "special treatment" after attending banking summit despite testing positive for Covid-19". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 2 November 2022. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  108. "National education is not "brainwashing": education secretary". The Standard. 17 July 2022. Archived from the original on 17 July 2022. Retrieved 17 July 2022.
  109. Cheung, Jane; Hui, Sophie (25 August 2022). "PolyU unveils new entrance after siege". The Standard. Archived from the original on 25 August 2022. Retrieved 25 August 2022.
  110. "HK teachers to see conduct guidelines issued for enhancing national education: CE". The Standard. 15 September 2022. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 15 September 2022.
  111. "John Lee accuses Pelosi of badmouthing HK". RTHK. 3 August 2022. Archived from the original on 3 August 2022. Retrieved 3 August 2022.
  112. Lau, Chris; Wong, Natalie (10 August 2022). "Beijing renews pledge to adopt "one country, two systems" for Taiwan, calls principle "resounding success" in Hong Kong". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 10 August 2022.
  113. "HK shouldn't "snatch" but attract overseas talents: Lew Mon-hung". The Standard. Archived from the original on 25 August 2022. Retrieved 25 August 2022.
  114. Hibberd, Robin (24 August 2022). "Poor communication over Taiwan, press freedom and 2019 protests costing Hong Kong government public trust". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 25 August 2022.
  115. "John Lee takes longest break from weekly briefing than any CE in decade". The Standard. Archived from the original on 30 August 2022. Retrieved 30 August 2022.
  116. "John Lee marks 100th day in office, hints at policies on snatching talent for Hong Kong". The Standard. 8 October 2022. Archived from the original on 13 October 2022. Retrieved 8 October 2022.
  117. Lee, Peter (18 October 2022). "Almost half of Hongkongers have low or no expectations for John Lee's first Policy Address, survey finds". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 18 October 2022.
  118. Leung, Hillary (20 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: Satisfaction rate for John Lee's first speech lowest among all ex-leaders - survey". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 20 October 2022.
  119. Chau, Candice (19 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: Laws against insulting regional flag to be aligned with national flag legislation". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 19 October 2022.
  120. Lee, Peter (19 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: Reform of civil service to include "reward and punishment system" for gov't staff". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 19 October 2022.
  121. Chau, Candice (19 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: HK$60 million earmarked for kindergartens' "national education" scheme". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 19 October 2022.
  122. Leung, Hillary (19 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: "Review" of District Councils to be conducted in line with "patriots-only" rule". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 19 October 2022.
  123. Standard, The. "Civil servant chief announces updated service code, rules out being "politically neutral"". The Standard. Archived from the original on 25 October 2022. Retrieved 25 October 2022.
  124. Chau, Candice (19 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: John Lee vows 30,000 new public housing units to boost supply by 25% in 5 years". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 19 October 2022.
  125. "Govt target to cut public housing wait to 4.5 years". RTHK. 19 October 2022. Archived from the original on 19 October 2022. Retrieved 19 October 2022.
  126. "Policy address lacks efficient short-term measures: Democratic Party". The Standard. Archived from the original on 19 October 2022. Retrieved 19 October 2022.
  127. Ho, Kelly (19 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: John Lee has responded to China's Xi Jinping's order to tackle housing crisis, lawmakers say". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 19 October 2022.
  128. Lin, Edith (19 October 2022). "Hong Kong policy address: "Light Public Housing" scheme of 30,000 bigger temporary homes proposed to help bridge supply and demand gap". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 22 October 2022. Retrieved 19 October 2022.
  129. Cheng, Lilian; Lin, Edith (20 October 2022). "Hong Kong officials admit for first time failure to boost public housing supply in short term, but vow enough homes in coming decade". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 30 October 2022. Retrieved 20 October 2022.
  130. "John Lee denies housing policy "making up the numbers"". The Standard. 20 October 2022. Retrieved 20 October 2022.
  131. SCMP Editorial (23 October 2022). "No instant answer to the housing problem". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 22 October 2022. Retrieved 22 October 2022.
  132. "John Lee defends faster public flats, talent schemes". RTHK. 20 October 2022. Archived from the original on 20 October 2022. Retrieved 20 October 2022.
  133. Leung, Hillary (24 October 2022). "Hong Kong's John Lee defends labour sec.'s criticism of political cartoonist mocking talent attraction scheme". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 24 October 2022.
  134. "Uproar among medics as govt mulls mandatory public sector work". The Standard. 1 November 2022. Archived from the original on 1 November 2022. Retrieved 1 November 2022.
  135. Standard, The. "CE believes in health graduates' devotion to Hong Kong over compulsory govt service  ". The Standard. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  136. "Public sector mandate to cover dentists, nurses: Lo - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  137. "Hong Kong to ban CBD, put it in same category as heroin, cocaine". The Standard. 20 October 2022. Archived from the original on 20 October 2022. Retrieved 20 October 2022.
  138. Chau, Candice (16 January 2022). "Explainer: How to measure Hong Kong's mass exodus". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 23 October 2022.
  139. Wong, Natalie; Cheung, Tony (20 September 2022). "Beijing official calls talk of emigration wave from Hong Kong "inappropriate"". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 21 October 2022.
  140. "'Talent trawl won't disadvantage local workers'". RTHK. Retrieved 21 October 2022.
  141. "Hong Kong's DNA will win back talent: John Lee". RTHK. 21 October 2022. Retrieved 21 October 2022.
  142. Li, Almond (2 November 2022). "116,600 young Hongkongers left workforce in past 2 years". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  143. Chau, Candice (23 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: How much of John Lee's maiden speech was old wine in new bottles?". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 23 October 2022.
  144. "CUHK survey finds fewer Hongkongers to emigrate as city enjoys better living". The Standard. Retrieved 27 October 2022.
  145. Standard, The. "Far fewer foreign workers arrive in Hong Kong during pandemic ". The Standard. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  146. Standard, The. "A third of Hong Kongers seeking UK visas were minors, report says". The Standard. Retrieved 13 November 2022.
  147. Lee, Peter. "Over 144,000 Hongkongers move to UK in 2 years since launch of BNO visa scheme - Hong Kong Free Press HKFP". hongkongfp.com. Retrieved 1 February 2023.
  148. Burns, John (31 October 2022). "Hong Kong's social divisions should be recognised, not wished away". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 31 October 2022.
  149. Lee, Peter (19 October 2022). "Hong Kong Policy Address: New rail link among 6 major infrastructure projects, public transport subsidy extended". Hong Kong Free Press. Retrieved 12 November 2022.
  150. Liu, Oscar (24 October 2022). "Hong Kong authorities to prioritise Tseung Kwan O rail line's extension over other mega projects, but no timeline yet for new plans' completion". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 12 November 2022.
  151. Preston, Robert (28 October 2022). "Hong Kong gives priority to Tseung Kwan O Southern Extension". International Railway Journal. Retrieved 12 November 2022.
  152. Lee, Peter (15 November 2022). "Hong Kong police probe playing of protest anthem at rugby match in South Korea as Lee links song to "violence"". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  153. "A 'responsible' Google would fix search results: CE - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 13 December 2022.
  154. Lee, Peter (20 December 2022). "Legal basis for removing inaccurate Hong Kong anthem results from Google, John Lee says citing tech giant's policy". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 20 December 2022.
  155. Chau, Candice (28 November 2022). "BREAKING: Hong Kong asks Beijing to intervene after top court blocks bid to stop media tycoon Jimmy Lai from hiring UK lawyer". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 28 November 2022.
  156. "Hong Kong to ask Beijing to interpret national security law after Jimmy Lai victory". South China Morning Post. 28 November 2022. Retrieved 28 November 2022.
  157. "Hong Kong asks Beijing to interpret national security law after Jimmy Lai victory". South China Morning Post. 28 November 2022. Retrieved 28 November 2022.
  158. "Best to handle Lai's case with NSL interpretation: CE - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 29 November 2022.
  159. "Hong Kong's justice department to seek adjournment of Jimmy Lai trial on Tuesday". South China Morning Post. 29 November 2022. Retrieved 29 November 2022.
  160. "CE thanks Beijing for adding interpretation to agenda - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 28 December 2022.
  161. AFP (30 December 2022). "Beijing gives Hong Kong leader power to bar foreign lawyers after loss at top court". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  162. "National security committee supports law change: CE - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 13 January 2023.
  163. Cheng, Lilian; Lam, Nadia (12 April 2022). "Hong Kong elections: John Lee says Article 23 legislation will be a top priority". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 12 April 2022. Retrieved 12 April 2022.
  164. Cheung, Tony (10 October 2022). "Hong Kong's own national security law put on hold for more research". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 10 October 2022. Retrieved 10 October 2022.
  165. "John Lee plans to root out spies and fake journalists". RTHK.
  166. "Hong Kong's John Lee says some are using journalism as cover to 'launder money,' pursue political objectives". Hong Kong Free Press.
  167. "Hong Kong's ruling-class hypocrisy: how "patriotic" enablers of the crackdown cling onto their foreign escape routes". Hong Kong Free Press. 26 April 2021. Archived from the original on 26 April 2021. Retrieved 26 April 2021.
  168. "李家超妻兒被指持英籍 無回覆「愛國者治港」質疑". 明報教育網 (in Chinese (Hong Kong)). Archived from the original on 26 June 2021. Retrieved 4 April 2022.
  169. Lau, Chris (14 April 2022). "Hong Kong chief executive election 2022: a look at the family behind leadership hopeful John Lee". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 14 April 2022. Retrieved 14 April 2022.
  170. 曾膺十大父親 李家超:不接納打罵教子 打成一片同時保父親尊嚴 不求子逐名利. Ming Pao Daily News (Canada) 明報加東版. 8 April 2022. Archived from the original on 11 April 2022. Retrieved 14 April 2022.
  171. "Appendix to the 2017 Honours List" (PDF) (Press release). Government of Hong Kong. 1 July 2017. Archived (PDF) from the original on 8 October 2020. Retrieved 5 October 2020.
  172. "SB responds to media enquiries on S for S' health condition" (Press release). Government of Hong Kong. 25 March 2021. Archived from the original on 3 August 2021. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  173. "Domestic helper of John Lee Ka-chiu tests positive for Covid-19". The Standard. 15 February 2022. Archived from the original on 15 February 2022. Retrieved 15 February 2022.
  174. Lo, Clifford; Lam, Nadia (3 May 2022). "Hong Kong chief executive election 2022: police to mobilise as many as 7,000 officers to ensure "event runs smoothly and peacefully"". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 4 May 2022. Retrieved 4 May 2022.
  175. "John Lee: Who is Hong Kong's new hardline pro-Beijing leader?". BBC News. 8 May 2022. Archived from the original on 9 May 2022. Retrieved 9 May 2022.
  176. "Executive Council - Register of Interests of Executive Council". www.ceo.gov.hk. Archived from the original on 11 August 2020. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  177. Standard, The. "John Lee gets third dose of Sinovac vaccine". The Standard. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  178. "John Lee tests positive for Covid-19 - RTHK". news.rthk.hk. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  179. Li, Almond (21 November 2022). "Hong Kong's John Lee tests positive for Covid-19 after returning from APEC summit in Thailand". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 22 November 2022.
  180. Grundy, Tom (7 August 2020). "US sanctions Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, police chief and 9 other top officials for "undermining autonomy"". Hong Kong Free Press. Archived from the original on 3 March 2021. Retrieved 7 August 2020.
  181. Macias, Amanda (7 August 2020). "U.S. sanctions Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam for carrying out Chinese "policies of suppression"". CNBC. Washington. Archived from the original on 7 August 2020. Retrieved 7 August 2020.
  182. "Treasury Sanctions Individuals for Undermining Hong Kong's Autonomy" (Press release). Washington: United States Department of the Treasury. 7 August 2020. Archived from the original on 7 August 2020. Retrieved 7 August 2020.
  183. Li, Sandy (21 August 2020). "Teresa Cheng's mortgage under scrutiny as US sanctions cut bank ties". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 24 August 2020. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  184. "Identification of Foreign Persons Involved in the Erosion of the Obligations of China Under the Joint Declaration or the Basic Law" (Press release). Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs. 14 October 2020. Archived from the original on 14 October 2020. Retrieved 14 October 2020.
  185. Yiu, Pak (20 April 2022). "YouTube shuts account of Hong Kong leadership candidate John Lee". Nikkei Asia. Hong Kong. Archived from the original on 22 April 2022. Retrieved 23 April 2022.
  186. Toh, Michelle; Chang, Wayne; Yee, Lizzy (22 April 2022). "Chinese officials slam YouTube for removing account of Hong Kong's expected next leader". CNN Business. Hong Kong/Taipei: CNN. Archived from the original on 22 April 2022. Retrieved 30 July 2022.
  187. "Hong Kong's John Lee "laughs off" US sanctions, says they have "no legal basis" in city". AFP. Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. 11 October 2022. Retrieved 11 October 2022.
  188. "Sanction assessment against the new Chief Executive of Hong Kong, John Lee". European Parliament. 2 June 2022. Archived from the original on 30 September 2022. Retrieved 1 July 2022.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.