Indiana, Pennsylvania

Indiana is a borough in and the county seat of Indiana County in the U.S. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.[3] The population was 13,564 at the 2020 census,[4] and since 2013 has been part of the Pittsburgh metropolitan area.[5] After being a long time part of the Pittsburgh and Johnstown television markets. Indiana is also the principal city of the Indiana, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Indiana, Pennsylvania
Borough
Downtown Indiana
Location of Indiana in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.
Indiana
Indiana
Coordinates: 40°37′N 79°9′W
CountryUnited States
StatePennsylvania
CountyIndiana
Settled1805
Incorporated1816
Government
  TypeCouncil-Manager
  MayorWilliam Simmons
  ManagerNicole Sipos
Area
  Total1.76 sq mi (4.57 km2)
  Land1.76 sq mi (4.56 km2)
  Water0.01 sq mi (0.01 km2)
Elevation
1,301 ft (397 m)
Population
  Total14,044
  Density7,984.08/sq mi (3,082.17/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
Zip code
15701
FIPS code42-36816
Websitewww.indianaboro.com

The borough and the region as a whole promote itself as the "Christmas Tree Capital of the World" because the national Christmas Tree Growers Association was founded there. There are still many Christmas tree farms in the area. The largest employer in the borough today is Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the second-largest of 14 PASSHE schools in the state.[6]

History

Indiana gets its name from Indiana County, which in turn gets its name from the "Indiana grant" of the First Treaty of Fort Stanwix.[7] Indiana was founded in 1805 to be the new county's seat from a grant of land by Founding Father George Clymer. By 1810, it had a population of 125.[7]

On at least one occasion, an anti-slavery mob in Indiana rescued a fugitive slave from extradition back to slavery in the South.[8] The town was also where James Moorhead, a local abolitionist leader, published several anti-slavery newspapers.[9] The first of these was The Clarion of Freedom, founded in 1843. Moorhead eventually sold the Clarion and founded a new anti-slavery paper, the Indiana Independent, which he published until his death in 1857. The Independent was published by his son J. W. Moorhead after his death.

The Indiana Weekly Messenger was published in the town between 1874 and 1946.[10]

The Downtown Indiana Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993. Also listed on the National Register are Breezedale, Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway Indiana Passenger Station, Silas M. Clark House, Graff's Market, James Mitchell House, Old Indiana County Courthouse, Indiana Borough 1912 Municipal Building, Indiana Armory, Old Indiana County Jail and Sheriff's Office, and John Sutton Hall.[11]

Economy

Three iron foundries operated in Indiana at different times between 1851 and 1948.[12]

McCreary Tire and Rubber opened a plant in Indiana in 1914.[13] McCreary was renamed to Specialty Tires of America in 1992, and has its main office in Indiana.[14][15]

Notable people

James Stewart (1948)

Indiana was the birthplace and hometown of actor Jimmy Stewart (1908–1997),[16] who was born there and lived at 104 North 7th Street. Despite the fact that he left the area upon graduating from high school, the town always followed his career closely, with the local newspaper periodically publishing rumors in his later years that Stewart planned to return there to live. On May 20, 1983, Stewart was given a 75th birthday celebration by the town. Before Stewart's death, a museum to his memory was opened on the third floor of the local public library, and a bronze statue of Stewart was erected in his honor at the county courthouse during his 75th birthday. The town annually holds a Jimmy Stewart film festival as part of the town's "It's a Wonderful Life" holiday celebration. [17]

Environmentalist author Edward Abbey (1927–1989) was born at the Indiana hospital and raised in Indiana and near the Indiana County towns and villages of Saltsburg, Home, and Tanoma. His first novel, Jonathan Troy (1954), is set entirely in a thinly disguised Indiana, and his novel The Fool's Progress (1988), which he called his "fat masterpiece", is an autobiographical account of his growing up in this area and his imagined attempt to return home after a lifetime spent mostly in the desert Southwest. His nonfiction book Appalachian Wilderness (1970) lovingly describes Indiana and Home.[18] There is a Pennsylvania state historical marker for Abbey.

  • James H. Bronson, Medal of Honor recipient in American Civil War
  • Renée Fleming, Lyric Soprano and National Medal of Arts recipient who has sung in world's most prestigious opera houses; Tony Award nominee for Rodgers and Hammerstein's Carousel
  • Connie Kunkle (1958-2016), Former ShopHQ host, singer and television personality
  • Chris Kuzneski, author
  • Ernest W. Lewis, Arizona territorial jurist
  • Paul McCandless, Grammy Award-winning jazz woodwind player and composer
  • Jim Nance, football player inducted into New England Patriots Hall of Fame in 2009, was born in Indiana and graduated from Indiana High School
  • Sandy McPeak, actor
  • Harriet Earhart Monroe (1842–1927), lecturer, educator, writer, traveling producer of religious stage plays
  • Tawni O'Dell, author
  • Michael Ryan, Major League Baseball player
  • Joe Saylor, Jazz percussionist for Stay Human
  • Edward Scofield, 19th Governor of Wisconsin; lived in Indiana, PA
  • Steve Wheatcroft, professional golfer
  • Mary Wiggins, composer
  • Jack Sonni, guitarist and writer
  • Joe Saylor, drummer for Jon Batiste and the Stay Human Band, House drummer for the Late Show with Stephen Colbert

Geography

Indiana, Pennsylvania is located at 40°37′16″N 79°9′18″W (40.6211, -79.1549).[19] The borough is an independent municipality surrounded by White Township. For some time in the 1990s there was discussion of merging the borough and township, but the matter was never acted upon.

Downtown Indiana

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km2), all of it land.

Climate

Indiana has a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb), with warm summers and cold, snowy winters. Precipitation is highest in the summer months, falling as snow usually between November and April.

Climate data for Indiana, Pennsylvania (3mi SE) (1991–2020 normals, extremes 1946–present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 75
(24)
78
(26)
86
(30)
91
(33)
91
(33)
95
(35)
98
(37)
99
(37)
97
(36)
87
(31)
81
(27)
76
(24)
99
(37)
Average high °F (°C) 35.8
(2.1)
39.2
(4.0)
48.8
(9.3)
61.7
(16.5)
71.5
(21.9)
78.7
(25.9)
82.5
(28.1)
81.1
(27.3)
74.8
(23.8)
63.4
(17.4)
51.0
(10.6)
40.7
(4.8)
60.8
(16.0)
Daily mean °F (°C) 26.7
(−2.9)
28.8
(−1.8)
37.1
(2.8)
48.3
(9.1)
58.7
(14.8)
66.5
(19.2)
70.7
(21.5)
69.4
(20.8)
63.0
(17.2)
51.9
(11.1)
40.5
(4.7)
32.3
(0.2)
49.5
(9.7)
Average low °F (°C) 17.6
(−8.0)
18.4
(−7.6)
25.4
(−3.7)
34.9
(1.6)
46.0
(7.8)
54.4
(12.4)
58.8
(14.9)
57.7
(14.3)
51.2
(10.7)
40.3
(4.6)
30.0
(−1.1)
23.9
(−4.5)
38.2
(3.4)
Record low °F (°C) −24
(−31)
−26
(−32)
−10
(−23)
10
(−12)
16
(−9)
31
(−1)
35
(2)
34
(1)
25
(−4)
11
(−12)
−4
(−20)
−19
(−28)
−26
(−32)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.64
(92)
2.95
(75)
3.88
(99)
4.03
(102)
4.32
(110)
4.81
(122)
5.13
(130)
4.26
(108)
4.18
(106)
3.52
(89)
3.50
(89)
3.64
(92)
47.86
(1,216)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 13.3
(34)
11.8
(30)
6.1
(15)
1.1
(2.8)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
2.7
(6.9)
10.8
(27)
45.8
(116)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 17.2 14.3 13.5 14.7 15.2 13.6 13.6 12.1 11.9 12.7 13.3 15.1 167.2
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 10.0 7.8 4.5 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.4 6.1 31.8
Source: NOAA[20][21]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820317
183043336.6%
184067455.7%
185096342.9%
18601,33138.2%
18701,60520.6%
18801,90718.8%
18901,9632.9%
19004,142111.0%
19105,74938.8%
19207,04322.5%
19309,56935.9%
194010,0505.0%
195011,74316.8%
196013,00510.7%
197016,10023.8%
198016,051−0.3%
199015,174−5.5%
200014,895−1.8%
201013,975−6.2%
202014,0440.5%
2021 (est.)13,508[4]−3.8%
Sources:[22][23][24][25][2]

As of the census[24] of 2010, there were 13,975 people,[26] and 4,624 households residing in the borough. The population density in 2000 was 8,440.0 people per square mile (3,267.6/km2). There were 5,096 housing units at an average density of 2,887.6 per square mile (1,117.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.51% White, 5.19% African American, 0.07% Native American, 1.89% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.44% from other races, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.20% of the population.

There were 4,804 households, out of which 14.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 26.5% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 65.3% were non-families. 34.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the borough the population was spread out, with 8.2% under the age of 18, 59.4% from 18 to 24, 13.7% from 25 to 44, 10.5% from 45 to 64, and 8.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 22 years. For every 100 females, there were 83.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.3 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $21,279, and the median income for a family was $47,768. Males had a median income of $32,333 versus $27,831 for females.[27] The per capita income for the borough was $12,317. About 11.2% of families and 44.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.3% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Postcard depicting Sutton Hall at IUP

Indiana University of Pennsylvania (or IUP) is a public university founded in 1875, originally founded as Indiana Normal School.[28]

For public K-12 education, the Indiana Area School District supports four neighborhood elementary schools (Eisenhower, Horace Mann, East Pike, and Ben Franklin), a junior high school (Indiana Area Junior High School), and a high school (Indiana Area Senior High School), which are accredited and recognized for quality. A Catholic-affiliated Pre-K through grade 6 program is offered at the St. Bernard School,[29] in addition to other various parochial schools for different denominations.

Early care and education programs for pre-k children are available. The non-profit IndiKids or (Indiana County Child Day Care Centers) offers NAEYC-accredited care for children of students and community members on the campus of IUP and throughout the community.

Local media

Indiana's local newspaper is the Indiana Gazette. Indiana is also home to several radio stations:

FM stations
Call lettersFrequencyFormatLocationOwner
WCOA-FM88.5ReligiousJohnstownFamily Life Ministries, Inc.
WQEJ89.7ClassicalJohnstownWQED Multimedia
WIUP90.1CollegeIndianaIndiana University of Pennsylvania
WQMU92.5Hot ACIndianaRenda Media
WFGI-FM95.5CountryJohnstownForever Media
WKYE96.5Adult ContemporaryJohnstownForever Media
WRKW99.1Classic RockEbensburgForever Media
WDAD100.3Classic HitsIndianaRenda Media
WCCS101.1News/TalkHomer CityRenda Media
WFSJ103.7Christian ContemporaryIndianaGodstock Ministries, Inc.
WMUG105.1ReligiousIndianaThe Christian Witness, Inc.
WLCY106.3CountryBlairsvilleRenda Media
AM stations
Call lettersFrequencyFormatLocationOwner
WCCS1160News/TalkHomer CityRenda Media
WDAD1450Classic HitsIndianaRenda Media

Indiana is served by two television markets: Pittsburgh and Johnstown-Altoona.

References

  1. "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 12, 2022.
  2. "Census Population API". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 12, 2022.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. Bureau, US Census. "City and Town Population Totals: 2020-2021". Census.gov. US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 7, 2022.
  5. "Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). Office of Management and Budget. February 28, 2013. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 21, 2017. Retrieved January 4, 2017 via National Archives.
  6. Swetnam, George (1991). A Guideline to Historic Western Pennsylvania. University of Pittsburgh Press. ISBN 0822936305.
  7. "History of Indiana County, PA". sites.rootsweb.com. Retrieved May 2, 2022.
  8. Archives, Special Collections and University; Stapleton Library, Room 302 431 South Eleventh Street Indiana; Phone: 724-357-3039; Fax: 724-357-4891. "Indiana County and the Underground Railroad". Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved May 2, 2022.
  9. Archives, Special Collections and University; Stapleton Library, Room 302 431 South Eleventh Street Indiana; Phone: 724-357-3039; Fax: 724-357-4891. "Antislavery Newspapers". Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved May 2, 2022.
  10. "About The Indiana weekly messenger. (Indiana, Pa.) 1874-1946". Library of Congress. Archived from the original on January 19, 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  11. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  12. "The Indiana Foundries". HGSIC Historical Happenings. December 15, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2022.
  13. "McCreary Tire and Rubber Company". HGSIC Historical Happenings. Retrieved April 29, 2022.
  14. Gannon, Joyce (August 1, 2002). "Obituary: Donald D. Mateer / Rescued tire company that was on the skids". post-gazette.com Local News. Retrieved April 29, 2022.
  15. "Company". Specialty Tires of America. Retrieved April 29, 2022.
  16. "Jimmy Stewart - Biography on Bio". December 8, 2009. Archived from the original on December 8, 2009.
  17. "Indiana County Holiday Season".
  18. Jackson, Kenneth T., ed. (1999). "Abbey, Edward Paul". The Scribner Encyclopedia of American Lives. New York, NY: Charles Scribner's Sons.
  19. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Archived from the original on May 27, 2002. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  20. "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  21. "Station: Indiana 3 SE, PA". U.S. Climate Normals 2020: U.S. Monthly Climate Normals (1991-2020). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  22. "Number of Inhabitants: Pennsylvania" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 8, 2013. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  23. "Pennsylvania: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 8, 2013. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  24. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  25. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  26. Wells, Randy. "Census finds more losses than gain in Indiana County". Indiana Gazette.
  27. "Source: 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-year estimates released December 2011" (PDF). US Government. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 20, 2013. Retrieved October 10, 2012.
  28. "Brief History".
  29. "St. Bernard Regional Catholic School". stbernardlc.org. October 14, 2016. Archived from the original on January 19, 2015. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
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