Hopedale, Newfoundland and Labrador

Hopedale (Inuit language: Agvituk)[4] is a town located in the north of Labrador, the mainland portion of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Hopedale is the legislative capital of the Inuit Land Claims Area Nunatsiavut, and where the Nunatsiavut Assembly meets.[5][6][7] As of the 2021 census it has a population of 596.

Hopedale
Agvituk
Inuit community
Hopedale
Nickname: 
Place of the Whales
Hopedale
Location of Hopedale in Labrador
Coordinates: 55°27′39″N 60°14′00″W[1]
CountryCanada
ProvinceNewfoundland and Labrador
RegionNunatsiavut
Settled1782
IncorporatedMay 12, 1969
Government
  TypeInuit Community Government
  Mayor (AngajukKâk)Marjorie Flowers
  Federal MPYvonne Jones (L)
  Provincial MHALela Evans (NDP)
  Nunatsiavut Assembly memberTerry Vincent (I)[3]
Area
  Land3.35 km2 (1.29 sq mi)
Population
 (2021)
  Total596
  Density157.9/km2 (409/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-04:00 (AST)
  Summer (DST)UTC-03:00 (ADT)
Area code709
ClimateDfc

History

Hopedale was founded as an Inuit settlement named Agvituk, Inuktitut for "place of the whales". In 1782, Moravian missionaries from Germany arrived in the area to convert the population. They renamed the settlement Hopedale (Hoffental in German) shortly afterward. The Hopedale Mission is still standing and is thought to be the oldest wooden-frame building in Canada standing east of Quebec. As such, it was named a National Historic Site of Canada.[8] It is currently run by the Agvituk Historical Society as a part of a museum on the history of missionaries in the area.

From 1953 to 1968 a joint Royal Canadian Air Force-United States Air Force's Hopedale Air Station was located on the hills above Hopedale. Civilian personnel lived in the main part of town. Since 1968 the area has remained abandoned other than maintenance of non-military communications towers nearby.[9]

Nunatsiavut

Nunatsiavut Assembly Building

On December 1, 2005, Hopedale became the legislative capital[10] of the autonomous region of Nunatsiavut which is the name chosen by the Labrador Inuit when the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement Act was successfully ratified by the Canadian Government and the Inuit of Labrador.[11] Nain, further north, is the administrative capital.[12] The land claim cedes limited self-rule for the Nunatsiavut government in Northern Labrador and North-Eastern Quebec, granting title and aboriginal rights.[12] The land that comprises the Nunatsiavut government is called the Labrador Inuit Settlement Area, or LISA, which amount to approximately 72,500 km2 (28,000 sq mi).[13] The Inuit of Labrador do not own this land per se, but they do have special rights related to traditional land use as aboriginals. That said, the Labrador Inuit will own 15,000 km2 (5,800 sq mi) within the Settlement Area, officially designated as Labrador Inuit Lands. The Agreement also provides for the establishment of the Torngat Mountains National Park Reserve, consisting of about 9,600 square kilometres (3,700 sq mi) of land within LISA.[13][14] As legislative capital, Hopedale is the location of the Nunatsiavut Assembly Building.[15]

Demographics

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Hopedale had a population of 596 living in 193 of its 208 total private dwellings, a change of 3.8% from its 2016 population of 574.[16] With a land area of 2.18 km2 (0.84 sq mi), it had a population density of 273.4/km2 (708.1/sq mi) in 2021.[17]

The majority of people in Hopedale (79%) speak English as a first language, but a significant minority (21%) speak Inuktitut.

About 83% of the population identify themselves as Inuit, 16% are of mainly European descent, and 1% are of Punjabi origin.

About 87% of the population belongs to a Protestant denomination, about 2% are Roman Catholic, and another 1% are Sikh. About 10% are not affiliated with any religion.

Transportation

There are no roads that connect Hopedale with the rest of Newfoundland and Labrador.[18][19][20]

Hopedale Airport, a small public airport, connects the area with small communities in Newfoundland and Labrador and connections beyond made via Goose Bay Airport.[21] The airport was built in the mid 1960s to provide air support to former USAF Hopedale Air Station. Since 1968 the airport is used by civilians.

The airport handles only small turboprop aircraft or helicopters. There is only one service building at the airport. The airport is connected to Hopedale via Airstrip Road.

Between mid-June and mid-November (pending ice conditions), the ferry MV Kamutik W, operated by the Newfoundland and Labrador Government, provides weekly service[22] from Goose Bay along the Atlantic Coast, with stops in Rigolet, Makkovik, Postville, Hopedale, Nain, and Natuashish.[23] Small boats are used to access nearby areas by water.

Local land based transportation in the community is made by private vehicles (cars, trucks, ATV) and snowmobile in winter. There are only a few roads in the community, all gravel:

  • Airstrip Road - access to Hopedale Airport
  • American Road - former access road to USAF radar stations and barracks
  • Carpenter Road and Drive - serves new residential area
  • Government Road - former route home to non-military personnel for former USAF radar station
  • Nanuk Road
  • Water Road - road to main part of Hopedale

Services

Policing in Hopedale is provided by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police which has a Hopedale Detachment staffed by four officers. The current detachment was completed in 1994.[24]

There is no hospital located in Hopedale and only basic medical services are provided by Hopedale Community Clinic. The clinic is operated by Labrador-Grenfell Health Authority and is staffed by three nurses/nurse practitioners. Physicians visit periodically, and are also available by video conference.[25] Advanced care requires patients to be flown out of town by air ambulance to the nearest hospital which is in Happy Valley-Goose Bay.

Hopedale Volunteer Fire Department is a small fire and rescue service with a single pumper stored at the fire hall located next to the RCMP detachment near Water Road.

Canada Post has a post office (19 Harbour Drive B) located in town.

Amos Comenius Memorial School at Nanuk Hill, with grades Kindergarten to Grade 12,[26] is the only school in Hopedale.

DJ's Convenience, Big Land Grocery, Northland Enterprises (with Sylvia's Take Out) are the only stores selling food and other convenience goods in town.[26]

Government

AngajukKâk are equivalent of mayor in Hopedale and are elected every four years. The incumbent is Marjorie Flowers.[27]

Past AngajukKâk:

Local attractions

Hopedale, Moravian mission, Labrador, NL, 1881-85

There are few local attractions:[29]

  • Moravian Mission Complex and Museum
  • Mid-Canada Line Site 200 - a former American and RCAF facility and was the most easterly repeater radar station and with view of Hopedale from the highest point in town
  • Amaguk Inn - offers local accommodation for visitors (18 rooms) and also sells local arts and crafts[30]

Climate

Climate data for Hopedale (AUT)
Coordinates 55°27′N 60°13′W; elevation: 10 m (33 ft); 1961–1990, extremes 1942–present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 5.6
(42.1)
7.2
(45.0)
10.0
(50.0)
11.8
(53.2)
28.3
(82.9)
31.1
(88.0)
33.3
(91.9)
29.4
(84.9)
25.6
(78.1)
20.6
(69.1)
12.9
(55.2)
8.9
(48.0)
33.3
(91.9)
Average high °C (°F) −12.3
(9.9)
−11.6
(11.1)
−6.9
(19.6)
−1.1
(30.0)
4.6
(40.3)
10.0
(50.0)
14.4
(57.9)
14.3
(57.7)
10.2
(50.4)
4.5
(40.1)
−0.6
(30.9)
−7.8
(18.0)
1.5
(34.7)
Daily mean °C (°F) −16.4
(2.5)
−16.1
(3.0)
−11.4
(11.5)
−5.2
(22.6)
1.3
(34.3)
6.0
(42.8)
10.3
(50.5)
10.6
(51.1)
7.0
(44.6)
1.9
(35.4)
−3.2
(26.2)
−11.2
(11.8)
−2.2
(28.0)
Average low °C (°F) −20.7
(−5.3)
−20.8
(−5.4)
−16.0
(3.2)
−9.4
(15.1)
−2.1
(28.2)
2.0
(35.6)
6.2
(43.2)
6.9
(44.4)
3.8
(38.8)
−0.8
(30.6)
−5.9
(21.4)
−14.8
(5.4)
−6.0
(21.3)
Record low °C (°F) −40.0
(−40.0)
−40.0
(−40.0)
−35.0
(−31.0)
−28.2
(−18.8)
−17.2
(1.0)
−5.6
(21.9)
−1.1
(30.0)
1.1
(34.0)
−5.0
(23.0)
−12.2
(10.0)
−20.6
(−5.1)
−30.0
(−22.0)
−40.0
(−40.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 75.1
(2.96)
77.7
(3.06)
79.1
(3.11)
56.3
(2.22)
50.7
(2.00)
65.2
(2.57)
86.0
(3.39)
70.2
(2.76)
57.9
(2.28)
68.3
(2.69)
64.8
(2.55)
70.6
(2.78)
821.9
(32.37)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 3.5
(0.14)
3.2
(0.13)
3.4
(0.13)
8.3
(0.33)
24.2
(0.95)
58.3
(2.30)
85.4
(3.36)
70.2
(2.76)
55.5
(2.19)
48.2
(1.90)
13.7
(0.54)
4.3
(0.17)
378.2
(14.9)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 72.4
(28.5)
75.2
(29.6)
76.5
(30.1)
48.3
(19.0)
25.2
(9.9)
6.6
(2.6)
0.6
(0.2)
0.0
(0.0)
2.4
(0.9)
20.2
(8.0)
51.2
(20.2)
67.2
(26.5)
445.8
(175.5)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 16 14 16 14 13 13 15 15 13 14 16 17 176
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 1.0 trace 2 3 8 12 15 15 13 10 4 2 85
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 16 13 15 13 8 2 trace 0 trace 8 13 16 104
Average relative humidity (%) 78 79 80 80 78 74 75 74 71 75 81 79 77
Source: Environment Canada[31]

See also

References

  1. "Hopedale". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
  2. "Hopedale". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
  3. https://nunatsiavut.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/Official-May-3-Election-Results-for-Ordinary-Members.pdf
  4. Issenman, Betty. Sinews of Survival: The living legacy of Inuit clothing. UBC Press, 1997. pp252-254
  5. "Labrador Inuit land claim passes last hurdle". CBC News. June 24, 2005. Archived from the original on March 21, 2007. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  6. "Inuit celebrate self-government turnover". CBC News. December 1, 2005. Archived from the original on March 16, 2007. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  7. Fitzpatrick, Ashley (July 31, 2012). "Nunatsiavut building and rebuilding". NS Business Journal. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016.
  8. Hopedale Mission. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 8 July 2012.
  9. "NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR – Canadian Military History".
  10. Minogue, Sara (June 4, 2004). "Inuit, Métis at odds over Labrador land claim deal". Nunatsiaqonline.ca. Archived from the original on October 12, 2016.
  11. "Labrador's Inuit cheer land agreement". CBC News. January 23, 2005. Archived from the original on January 20, 2007. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  12. "Nunatsiavut Government". nunatsiavut.com. Archived from the original on 2010-02-28. Retrieved 26 December 2018.
  13. "Land Claim". nunatsiavut.com. Archived from the original on 2008-06-09. Retrieved 2008-09-23.
  14. "Torngat Mountains National Park Reserve". Archived from the original on 2007-10-22. Retrieved 2008-09-23.
  15. "Nunatsiavut building and rebuilding - Construction & Transportation - Daily Business Buzz". Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2015-02-09.
  16. "Census Profile, 2016 Census". 8 February 2017. Retrieved Oct 16, 2020.
  17. "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, census divisions and census subdivisions (municipalities), Newfoundland and Labrador". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  18. Moore, Angel (Apr 5, 2020). "Indigenous leaders asking that access to Labrador be sealed off". APTN News. Retrieved Oct 16, 2020.
  19. Mercer, Greg (5 April 2020). "'We are not prepared': Inuit brace for coronavirus to reach remote communities - The Globe and Mail". The Globe and Mail.
  20. "Torngat MHA Calls for New Road to Open Path to North Coast of Labrador". VOCM News. Sep 23, 2020. Retrieved Nov 5, 2020.
  21. Churchill Duke, Laura (20 Sep 2019). "Hopedale woman circulating petition calling for the province to subsidize flights to northern Labrador". Saltwire. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  22. "Goose Bay - Rigolet - Cartwright - Black Tickle - Ports North To Nain". Provincial Ferry Services. Archived from the original on 2009-08-11. Retrieved 2009-08-30.
  23. "Ferry Service". Tourism Nunatsiavut. Retrieved Nov 4, 2020.
  24. "Hopedale Detachment". Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. January 1994. Retrieved Nov 4, 2020.
  25. "Hopedale Community Clinic". Labrador-Grenfell Health. 23 April 2018. Retrieved Nov 4, 2020.
  26. "Amos Comenius Memorial School". amoscomenius.k12.nf.ca. Retrieved Nov 4, 2020.
  27. "Newly-Elected AngajukKâk For Hopedale". OKâlaKatiget Society. Dec 22, 2015. Retrieved Nov 4, 2020.
  28. "Wayne Piercy". linkedin.com.
  29. "Hopedale". Tourism Nunatsiavut. Retrieved Nov 4, 2020.
  30. "Amaguk Inn". Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism. Retrieved Nov 4, 2020.
  31. "Canadian Climate Normals 1961-1990 Station Data". Environment Canada. 3 February 2022.
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