Danish Asia Company

Danish Asiatic Company (Danish: Asiatisk Kompagni) was a Danish trading company established in 1730 to revive Danish trade on the Danish East Indies and China following the closure of the Danish East India Company.[1] It was granted a 40-year monopoly on Danish trade on Asia in 1732 and taken over by the Danish government in 1772. It was headquartered at Asiatisk Plads in Copenhagen. Its former premises are now used by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Management

Presidents

Board of directors

Members of the board of directors included:

  • 1730–1739: Gregorius Klauman
  • 1736–1746: Michael Fabritius
  • 1739–1752: Olfert Fas Fischer
  • 1743–1752: Joost van Hemert
  • 1745–1754: Peter van Hurk
  • 1769–1772: Gysbert Behagen
  • 1770–1775: John Brown
  • 1772–1775: Niels Ryberg
  • 1772–1784: Conrad Fabritius de Tengnagel
  • 1773–1775: William Halling
  • 1773–1775: Peder Hoppe
  • 1776–1783: Peter van Hemert
  • 1779–1784: Niels Ryberg
  • 1779-1785: John Brown
  • 1783-1792: Erich Erichsen
  • 1791-1805: Johan Leonhard Fix
  • 1792–1811: Carsten Anker, 1st director
  • 1812–1819: Christian Klingberg
  • 1816–1823: Conrad Hauser
  • 1819–1843: Friederich Christian Schäffer
  • 1837–1843: William Frederik Duntzfelt
  • Years unknown: Simon Hooglant
  • Unknown years: Hermann Abbestée
  • Unknown Years: René Pierre François Mourier
  • Rasmus Sternberg Selmer

Fleet

Details of some of these armed trading ships, often built by the Royal Danish dockyards as "handelskib, chinafarer", can be found at the Royal Danish Naval Museum website[2] Two have a history record at Skibregister.[3]

  • Cron Printz Christian
  • Slesvig**
  • Kongen af Danmark (built 1735)[4][2]
  • Dronningen af Danmark (built 1738)[4]
  • Prinsesse Lowisa (acquired 1738)[4]
  • Prinsesse Charlotte Amalie (acquired 1738)[4]
  • Cronprins (built 1740)[4]
  • Christiansborg Slot (built 1742)[4]
  • Trankebar (built 1744)[5]
  • Dokkwen (bought 1742)[5]
  • Lowisa (acquired 1744)[5][2]
  • Fyen (acquired 1745, former ship-of-the-line)[5][6][2]
  • Kronprinsessen af Danmark (built 1745)[5]
  • Kongen af Danmark (built 1745)[7]
  • Elephanten (acquired 1746, from Rotterdam)[7]
  • Kronprinsen af Danmark (built 1746)[7]
  • Dronningen af Danmark (built 1747) – renamed Dronning Sophie Magdalene i 1752[7][2]
  • Prinsesse Wilhelmine Caroline (built 1750)[8]
  • Dronning Juliane Marie (built 1752)[9][2]
  • Kongen af Danmark (built 1755)[9]
  • Dronning Sophie Magdalene (built 1761–62)[10][2]
  • Fredensborg Slot (built 1764–65)[10][2]
  • Rigernes Ønske (built 1766)[11][2]
  • Kongen af Danmark (built 1768–69)[11]
  • Bombardergalliot "Den Gloende" (built 1771)[2][12]
  • Prins Frederik (built 1772)[2]
  • Trankebar (built 1773)
  • Dronning Juliane Marie (built 1775)
  • Kronprinsen af Danmark (built 1778)
  • Prinsesse Sophia Frederica (built 1779)[2]
  • Dronning Juliane Marie (built 1780)
  • Prinsesse Charlotte Amalie (built 1781)[2]
  • Nicobar (built about 1781)
  • Holsteen (1782)
  • Danmark (bygget 1782–83)
  • Prinsesse Lowisa Magdalena (built about 1782)
  • Nicobar (build year unknown) (NB two ships called Nicobar. Are they the same?)
  • Mars (built 1784)[2]
  • Dannebrog (rebuilt 1786)
  • Kongen af Danmark (built 1788)
  • Prinsen af Augustenborg (built 1789)
  • Norge (rebuilt 1797–98)
  • Christianshavn (acquired 1800)
  • Kronprinsen af Danmark (acquired 1801)
  • Arveprinsen af Augustenborg (major repairs 1805)
  • Kanonchalup (built 1808)
  • Kanonchalup (built 1808)
  • Kanonchalup (built 1808)
  • Kanonchalup (built 1808)

References

  1. Glamann, Kristof (1960). "The Danish Asiatic Company, 1732–;1772". Scandinavian Economic History Review. 8 (2): 109–149. doi:10.1080/03585522.1960.10411426.
  2. Royal Danish Naval Museum -List of Danish Warships
  3. Royal Danish Naval Museum - Skibregister
  4. Klem p 220
  5. Klem p 222
  6. Record card for Fyen
  7. Klem p 224
  8. Klem p 226
  9. Klem p 228
  10. Klem p 232
  11. Klem p 234
  12. Record card for Den Gloende

Citations

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