1997 Major League Baseball season

The 1997 Major League Baseball season was the inaugural season for Interleague play, as well as the final season in the American League for the Milwaukee Brewers before moving to the NL the following season. The California Angels changed their name to the Anaheim Angels. The Florida Marlins ended the season (their fifth season in the majors) as the World Champions defeating the Cleveland Indians in a seven-game World Series, four games to three.

1997 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 1 – October 26, 1997
Number of games162
Number of teams28
TV partner(s)Fox/FSN/FX, ESPN, NBC
Draft
Top draft pickMatt Anderson
Picked byDetroit Tigers
Regular Season
Season MVPAL: Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
NL: Larry Walker (COL)
Postseason
AL championsCleveland Indians
  AL runners-upBaltimore Orioles
NL championsFlorida Marlins
  NL runners-upAtlanta Braves
World Series
ChampionsFlorida Marlins
  Runners-upCleveland Indians
World Series MVPLiván Hernández (FLA)

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

Division Series
(ALDS, NLDS)
League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
         
Central Cleveland 3
WC NY Yankees 2
Central Cleveland 4
American League
East Baltimore 2
East Baltimore 3
West Seattle 1
AL Cleveland 3
NL Florida 4
East Atlanta 3
Central Houston 0
East Atlanta 2
National League
WC Florida 4
West San Francisco 0
WC Florida 3

Awards and honors

Baseball Writers' Association of America Awards
BBWAA Award National League American League
Rookie of the Year Scott Rolen (PHI) Nomar Garciaparra (BOS)
Cy Young Award Pedro Martínez (MON) Roger Clemens (TOR)
Manager of the Year Dusty Baker (SF) Davey Johnson (BAL)
Most Valuable Player Larry Walker (COL) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Gold Glove Awards
Position National League American League
Pitcher Greg Maddux (ATL) Mike Mussina (BAL)
Catcher Charles Johnson (FLA) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman J. T. Snow (SF) Rafael Palmeiro (BAL)
Second Baseman Craig Biggio (HOU) Chuck Knoblauch (MIN)
Third Baseman Ken Caminiti (SD) Matt Williams (CLE)
Shortstop Rey Ordóñez (NYM) Omar Vizquel (CLE)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (SF) Jim Edmonds (ANA)
Raúl Mondesí (LA) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Larry Walker (COL) Bernie Williams (NYY)
Silver Slugger Awards
Pitcher/Designated Hitter John Smoltz (ATL) Edgar Martínez (SEA)
Catcher Mike Piazza (LA) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman Jeff Bagwell (HOU) Tino Martinez (NYY)
Second Baseman Craig Biggio (HOU) Chuck Knoblauch (MIN)
Third Baseman Vinny Castilla (COL) Matt Williams (CLE)
Shortstop Jeff Blauser (ATL) Nomar Garciaparra (BOS)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (SF) Juan González (TEX)
Tony Gwynn (SD) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Larry Walker (COL) David Justice (CLE)

Other awards

Player of the Month

MonthAmerican LeagueNational League
April Ken Griffey Jr.Larry Walker
May Frank ThomasTony Gwynn
June Jeff KingMike Piazza
July Tim SalmonBarry Bonds
August Bernie WilliamsMike Piazza
September Juan GonzálezMark McGwire

Pitcher of the Month

MonthAmerican LeagueNational League
April Andy PettitteTom Glavine
May Roger ClemensBobby Jones
June Randy JohnsonKent Mercker
July Chuck Finley
Brad Radke
Darryl Kile
August Roger ClemensPedro Martínez
September Jeff FasseroJeff Shaw

MLB statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVGFrank Thomas CHW.347Tony Gwynn SD.372
HRKen Griffey Jr. SEA56Larry Walker COL49
RBIKen Griffey Jr. SEA147Andrés Galarraga COL140
WinsRoger Clemens1 TOR21Denny Neagle ATL20
ERARoger Clemens1 TOR2.05Pedro Martínez MTL1.90
SORoger Clemens1 TOR292Curt Schilling PHI319
SVRandy Myers BAL45Jeff Shaw CIN42
SBBrian Hunter DET74Tony Womack PIT60

1 American League Triple Crown Pitching Winner

Managers

American League

TeamManagerNotes
Anaheim Angels Terry Collins
Baltimore Orioles Davey Johnson
Boston Red Sox Jimy Williams
Chicago White Sox Terry Bevington
Cleveland Indians Mike Hargrove Won American League Pennant
Detroit Tigers Buddy Bell
Kansas City Royals Bob Boone, Tony Muser
Milwaukee Brewers Phil Garner
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Joe Torre
Oakland Athletics Art Howe
Seattle Mariners Lou Piniella
Texas Rangers Johnny Oates
Toronto Blue Jays Cito Gaston, Mel Queen

National League

TeamManagerNotes
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox
Chicago Cubs Jim Riggleman
Cincinnati Reds Ray Knight, Jack McKeon
Colorado Rockies Don Baylor
Florida Marlins Jim Leyland Won World Series
Houston Astros Larry Dierker
Los Angeles Dodgers Bill Russell
Montreal Expos Felipe Alou
New York Mets Bobby Valentine
Philadelphia Phillies Terry Francona
Pittsburgh Pirates Gene Lamont
St. Louis Cardinals Tony La Russa
San Diego Padres Bruce Bochy
San Francisco Giants Dusty Baker

Home Field Attendance & Payroll

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game Est. Payroll
Colorado Rockies[1] 83 0.0% 3,888,453 -0.1% 48,006 $43,559,667 8.0%
Baltimore Orioles[2] 98 11.4% 3,711,132 1.8% 45,816 $58,516,400 7.2%
Atlanta Braves[3] 101 5.2% 3,464,488 19.4% 42,771 $52,278,500 5.2%
Cleveland Indians[4] 86 -13.1% 3,404,750 2.6% 42,034 $56,802,460 17.8%
Los Angeles Dodgers[5] 88 -2.2% 3,319,504 4.1% 40,982 $45,380,304 28.4%
Seattle Mariners[6] 90 5.9% 3,192,237 17.2% 39,410 $41,540,661 0.5%
Texas Rangers[7] 77 -14.4% 2,945,228 1.9% 36,361 $53,448,838 36.9%
St. Louis Cardinals[8] 73 -17.0% 2,634,014 -0.8% 32,519 $45,456,667 12.9%
Toronto Blue Jays[9] 76 2.7% 2,589,297 1.2% 31,967 $47,079,833 54.1%
New York Yankees[10] 96 4.3% 2,580,325 14.6% 32,254 $62,241,545 14.9%
Florida Marlins[11] 92 15.0% 2,364,387 35.4% 29,190 $48,692,500 56.4%
Boston Red Sox[12] 78 -8.2% 2,226,136 -3.8% 27,483 $43,558,750 2.7%
Chicago Cubs[13] 68 -10.5% 2,190,308 -1.3% 27,041 $42,155,333 27.4%
San Diego Padres[14] 76 -16.5% 2,089,333 -4.5% 25,794 $37,363,672 31.8%
Houston Astros[15] 84 2.4% 2,046,781 3.6% 25,269 $34,777,500 22.1%
Chicago White Sox[16] 80 -5.9% 1,864,782 11.2% 23,022 $57,740,000 27.5%
Cincinnati Reds[17] 76 -6.2% 1,785,788 -4.1% 22,047 $49,768,000 17.0%
Anaheim Angels[18] 84 20.0% 1,767,330 -2.9% 21,553 $31,135,472 7.9%
New York Mets[19] 88 23.9% 1,766,174 11.2% 21,805 $39,800,400 62.6%
San Francisco Giants[20] 90 32.4% 1,690,869 19.6% 20,875 $35,592,378 -4.2%
Pittsburgh Pirates[21] 79 8.2% 1,657,022 24.4% 20,457 $10,771,667 -53.2%
Kansas City Royals[22] 67 -10.7% 1,517,638 5.7% 18,970 $34,810,000 71.6%
Montreal Expos[23] 78 -11.4% 1,497,609 -7.4% 18,489 $19,295,500 18.6%
Philadelphia Phillies[24] 68 1.5% 1,490,638 -17.3% 18,403 $36,656,500 6.8%
Milwaukee Brewers[25] 78 -2.5% 1,444,027 8.8% 18,050 $23,655,338 8.9%
Minnesota Twins[26] 68 -12.8% 1,411,064 -1.8% 17,421 $34,072,500 47.4%
Detroit Tigers[27] 79 49.1% 1,365,157 16.8% 16,854 $17,272,000 -26.3%
Oakland Athletics[28] 65 -16.7% 1,264,218 10.1% 15,608 $24,018,500 13.1%

Events

January–March

  • January 5 – Boston Red Sox pitcher Tim Wakefield escapes serious injury when he is hit by a car while out jogging. He is released from the hospital after being treated for bruises.
  • January 6 – Knuckleballer Phil Niekro is elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers' Association of America. Niekro receives 80.34% of the vote. Pitcher Don Sutton falls nine votes short of election.
  • February 20 – The Philadelphia Phillies sign free agent outfielder Danny Tartabull. Tartabull broke his foot on Opening Day and sat out the year before retiring.
  • March 5 – Nellie Fox, Tommy Lasorda and Negro leaguer Willie Wells are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee.

April–May

  • April 15 – In an unprecedented move, Commissioner of Baseball Bud Selig announces on the 50th Anniversary of Jackie Robinson's debut that the number he wore with the Brooklyn Dodgers, number 42, would be unilaterally retired throughout all of Major League Baseball during a mid-game ceremony in a game between the Dodgers and the New York Mets at Shea Stadium Rachael Robinson, Jackie's widow and President Bill Clinton attend the event as well. The number would be worn by players during the anniversary of his major league debut, and would still be worn by players who started wearing the number before the announcement, most famously the New York Yankees' Mariano Rivera, until he retired after the 2013 season, thus officially retiring number 42, as he was the last player to wear the number 42 jersey on a regular basis.
  • April 29 – Chili Davis' 300th home run, leading off the 10th inning, snaps a 5–5 tie and gives the Kansas City Royals a 6–5 win over the Toronto Blue Jays.
  • May 7 – The Montréal Expos score a National League-record 13 runs in the 6th inning of their game against the San Francisco Giants on the way to a 19–3 win. The Expos send 17 batters to the plate. Mike Lansing homers twice in the inning to drive in five runs, becoming the third Expos player to perform the feat, and the first NL second baseman to do so since Bobby Lowe in 1894.
  • May 8 – At home, the Baltimore Orioles stop Randy Johnson's 16-game win streak with a decisive 13–3 pasting of the Seattle Mariners. Baltimore is led by catcher Chris Hoiles, who collects six RBI on two homers and a double. Johnson strikes out 10 in six innings, but gives up five runs on six hits and two walks in his attempt to become the first AL pitcher since Dave McNally (1968–69) to win 17 straight.
  • May 13 – Eddie Murray gets two hits in Anaheim's 8–7 win over the Chicago White Sox. The game is the 3,000th of Murray's career, making him only the sixth player in history to reach that mark, joining Pete Rose, Carl Yastrzemski, Hank Aaron, Ty Cobb and Stan Musial.
  • May 21 – Roger Clemens fires the Toronto Blue Jays past the New York Yankees 4–1, for his 8th win of the year against no losses. The Rocket wins his 200th game, the 94th pitcher to reach the 200 victories mark.
  • May 25 – The Minnesota Twins retire Kirby Puckett's uniform number 34 in a 90-minute pregame ceremony.
  • May 26 – In the Chicago Cubs' 2–1 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates, Cub Sammy Sosa and Pirate Tony Womack both hit inside-the-park home runs in the sixth inning. It is the first time two inside-the-park homers are hit in the same NL game since Lou Brock and Héctor Cruz of the St. Louis Cardinals did it against the San Diego Padres on June 18, 1976. Greg Gagne of the Twins had two for Minnesota on October 4, 1986.
  • May 26 – In Toronto, Roger Clemens allows one run and four hits in seven innings and strikes out seven to beat the Rangers 8–1. The Rocket is now 9–0, his best start since beginning 1986 at 14–0.
  • May 26 – Andrés Galarraga hits a 469-foot two-run homer and Vinny Castilla adds a solo shot as the Colorado Rockies overcome a six-run deficit to beat the Cardinals 9–7. Galarraga has four RBI, and his moon shot off Mark Petkovsek is the third-longest homer in the three-season history of Coors Field.
  • May 27 – Barry Larkin's streak of consecutively reaching base 13 times is stopped by Curt Schilling, who goes all the way to beat Cincinnati 2–1. Larkin singles in the first inning, but flies out in the 3rd to end his streak one shy of Pedro Guerrero's NL record, set in 1985.
  • May 30 – The Orioles' Mike Mussina retires the first 25 Indian batters before Sandy Alomar Jr. ruins his no-hit bid with a one-out single in the 9th. Mussina then strikes out the final two batters for a 3–0 victory.
  • May 31 – Cal Ripken Jr. snaps a 7th-inning tie with a record-breaking home run as the Baltimore Orioles rally from a 4-run deficit to beat the Cleveland Indians 8–5. Ripken's homer gives him 4,274 total bases with Baltimore, breaking the franchise mark for total bases in a career. Baltimore also place Eric Davis on the disabled list. Davis is suffering from colon cancer and will be operated on in early June.
  • May 31 – In Miami, Andrés Galarraga golfs a 529-foot grand slam, the longest home run ever at Pro Player Stadium. His homer gives the Colorado Rockies a 7–0 lead over the Florida Marlins, and they eventually win 8–4. Galarraga has three home runs in the past three games against Florida that traveled 1,435 feet, an average of 478 feet. He hit a 455-foot homer two days before and a 451-foot homer the previous day. The longest previous homer at the stadium was 482 feet by Pete Incaviglia of the Phillies off Al Leiter on May 1, 1996.
  • May 31 – Unbeaten Roger Clemens is the first 10-game winner in the majors, as the Toronto Blue Jays romp 13–3 over the Oakland Athletics.
  • May 31 – Ila Borders of the St. Paul Saints of the Northern League faces three Sioux Falls Canaries batters, and surrenders three earned runs, in her professional baseball debut. The Canaries, who led 4–0 when she entered the game, go on to defeat St. Paul 11–1.

June–July

August–September

October–December

Deaths

  • January 6 – Dick Donovan, 69, All-Star pitcher, mainly with the White Sox and Indians, who led AL in ERA in 1961 and won 20 games in 1962
  • January 20 – Curt Flood, 59, All-Star center fielder who won seven Gold Gloves and batted .300 six times; challenged baseball's reserve clause all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, unsuccessfully, after refusing a trade
  • February 7 – Manny Salvo, 83, Boston pitcher who tied for the National League lead in shutouts in 1940
  • February 13 – Bobby Adams, 75, third baseman for the Cincinnati Reds/Redlegs, Chicago White Sox, Baltimore Orioles and Chicago Cubs between 1946 and 1959
  • June 1 – Mickey Rocco, 81, Cleveland first baseman who led the American League in fielding percentage at his position in 1943 and 1945
  • June 9 – Thornton Lee, 90, All-Star pitcher who won over 100 games for the White Sox; won 22 games and led AL in ERA in 1941
  • July 31 – Eddie Miller, 80, 7-time All-Star shortstop for four NL teams who led league in fielding five times
  • August 23 – Guy Curtright, 84, White Sox outfielder who finished sixth in 1943 American League batting race with a .291 average
  • September 9 – Richie Ashburn, 70, Hall of Fame center fielder for the Phillies who batted .308 lifetime, winning two batting titles, and led NL in putouts nine times, hits three times, triples twice and steals once; retired with six of the top eight single-season putout totals in history
  • September 22 – Eddie Sawyer, 87, manager who led the Phillies' "Whiz Kids" to the 1950 pennant, later a scout
  • September 26 – Woody English, 91, All-Star infielder for the Cubs who batted .300 twice
  • October 6 – Johnny Vander Meer, 82, All-Star pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds who in 1938 became the only player to pitch two consecutive no-hitters; led NL in strikeouts three times
  • October 21 – Dolph Camilli, 90, All-Star first baseman who was the NL's MVP in 1941, leading the Brooklyn Dodgers to the pennant; had five 100-RBI seasons
  • November 2 – Roy McMillan, 68, All-Star shortstop for the Reds, Braves and Mets who won the NL's first three Gold Gloves; minor league manager, coach and scout
  • November 20 – Dick Littlefield, 71, well-traveled pitcher who played for nine teams, earning 15 of his 33 wins with the Pirates
  • November 27 – Buck Leonard, 90, Hall of Fame first baseman of the Negro leagues regularly among the league leaders in batting average and home runs

References

  1. "Colorado Rockies Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. "Florida Marlins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  28. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
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