1977 Major League Baseball season

The 1977 Major League Baseball season. The American League (AL) had its third expansion as the Seattle Mariners and Toronto Blue Jays began play. However, the National League (NL) did not expand, remaining at 12 teams compared to the AL's 14, until the Colorado Rockies and Florida Marlins joined the NL in 1993.

1977 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 6 – October 18, 1977
Number of games162
Number of teams26
TV partner(s)ABC, NBC
Draft
Top draft pickHarold Baines
Picked byChicago White Sox
Regular season
Season MVPAL: Rod Carew (MIN)
NL: George Foster (CIN)
Postseason
AL championsNew York Yankees
  AL runners-upKansas City Royals
NL championsLos Angeles Dodgers
  NL runners-upPhiladelphia Phillies
World Series
ChampionsNew York Yankees
  Runners-upLos Angeles Dodgers
World Series MVPReggie Jackson (NYY)

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
      
East NY Yankees 3
West Kansas City 2
AL NY Yankees 4
NL Los Angeles 2
East Philadelphia 1
West Los Angeles 3

Awards and honors

Major Awards

1977 MLB Award Winners
 American LeagueNational League
AwardPlayerPositionTeamPlayerPositionTeam
Most Valuable PlayerRod Carew2BMINGeorge FosterLFCIN
Cy Young AwardSparky LyleLHPNYYSteve CarltonLHPPHI
Rookie of the YearEddie Murray1BBALAndre DawsonCFMTL
Relief Man of the YearBill CampbellRHPBOSRollie FingersRHPSD

Gold Glove Awards

1977 Gold Glove Awards
 American LeagueNational League
PositionPlayerTeamPlayerTeam
PJim PalmerBALJim KaatPHI
CJim SundbergTEXJohnny BenchCIN
1BJim SpencerCHWSteve GarveyLA
2BFrank WhiteKCJoe MorganCIN
3BGraig NettlesNYYMike SchmidtPHI
SSMark BelangerBALDave ConcepciónCIN
OFJuan BeníquezTEXCésar GerónimoCIN
OFAl CowensKCGarry MaddoxPHI
OFCarl YastrzemskiBOSDave ParkerPIT

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVGRod Carew, MIN.388Dave Parker, PIT.338
HRJim Rice, BOS39George Foster, CIN52
RBIsLarry Hisle, MIN119George Foster, CIN149
SBFreddie Patek, KC68Frank Taveras, PIT70
WinsDave Goltz, MIN
Dennis Leonard, KC
Jim Palmer, BAL
20Steve Carlton, PHI23
ERAFrank Tanana, CAL2.54John Candelaria, PIT2.34
KsNolan Ryan, CAL341Phil Niekro, ATL262

All-Star game

July 19, 1977
Yankee Stadium, Bronx, New York
Team123456789RHE
National League401000020791
American League000002102580
Starting pitchers:
NL: Don Sutton
AL: Jim Palmer
WP: Don Sutton (1–0)   LP: Jim Palmer (0–1)
Home runs:
NL: Joe Morgan (1), Greg Luzinski (1), Steve Garvey (1)
AL: George Scott (1)
Most Valuable Player: Don Sutton, NL

Feats

No-Hitters

Cycles

  • Bob Watson, Houston Astros – June 24 vs. San Francisco Giants
  • John Mayberry, Kansas City Royals – August 5 vs. Chicago White Sox
  • Jack Brohamer, Chicago White Sox – September 24 at Seattle Mariners

Career Milestones

400 Home Runs

900 Stolen Bases

Home Field Attendance

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game
Los Angeles Dodgers[1] 98 6.5% 2,955,087 23.8% 36,483
Philadelphia Phillies[2] 101 0.0% 2,700,070 8.9% 33,334
Cincinnati Reds[3] 88 -13.7% 2,519,670 -4.2% 31,107
New York Yankees[4] 100 3.1% 2,103,092 4.5% 25,964
Boston Red Sox[5] 97 16.9% 2,074,549 9.4% 25,932
Kansas City Royals[6] 102 13.3% 1,852,603 10.3% 22,872
Toronto Blue Jays[7] 54 1,701,052 21,263
St. Louis Cardinals[8] 83 15.3% 1,659,287 37.5% 19,991
Chicago White Sox[9] 90 40.6% 1,657,135 81.1% 20,458
Chicago Cubs[10] 81 8.0% 1,439,834 40.3% 17,776
Montreal Expos[11] 75 36.4% 1,433,757 121.7% 17,701
California Angels[12] 74 -2.6% 1,432,633 42.3% 17,687
San Diego Padres[13] 69 -5.5% 1,376,269 -5.6% 16,991
Detroit Tigers[14] 74 0.0% 1,359,856 -7.3% 16,788
Seattle Mariners[15] 64 1,338,511 16,525
Texas Rangers[16] 94 23.7% 1,250,722 7.4% 15,441
Pittsburgh Pirates[17] 96 4.3% 1,237,349 20.6% 15,276
Baltimore Orioles[18] 97 10.2% 1,195,769 13.0% 14,763
Minnesota Twins[19] 84 -1.2% 1,162,727 62.5% 14,534
Milwaukee Brewers[20] 67 1.5% 1,114,938 10.2% 13,765
Houston Astros[21] 81 1.3% 1,109,560 25.2% 13,698
New York Mets[22] 64 -25.6% 1,066,825 -27.4% 13,504
Cleveland Indians[23] 71 -12.3% 900,365 -5.1% 11,116
Atlanta Braves[24] 61 -12.9% 872,464 6.6% 10,771
San Francisco Giants[25] 75 1.4% 700,056 11.7% 8,643
Oakland Athletics[26] 63 -27.6% 495,599 -36.5% 6,119

Notable events

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

  • October 7 – In Game Three of the National League Championship Series at Philadelphia's Veterans Stadium, the Los Angeles Dodgers were down 5–3 with 2 outs in the 9th inning. Pinch-hitter Vic Davalillo beats out a 2-strike drag bunt and pinch-hitter Manny Mota follows with a long double off Greg Luzinski's glove. Mota reaches third on a throw that Ted Sizemore mishandles. Davey Lopes' grounder caroms off Mike Schmidt's knee to Larry Bowa, and the shortstop's throw is ruled late although television replays and a scene from a 1977 Philadelphia Phillies highlight film showed that Lopes was out. Los Angeles pulls out a 6–5 victory over the Phillies.
  • October 18 – New York Yankees right fielder Reggie Jackson hits three first-pitch home runs, in consecutive at-bats, during the decisive Game 6 of the World Series, leading the crowd to serenade him with chants of "Reg-gie! Reg-gie!" after his final home run lands deep in "the black" (center field bleachers). Jackson's historic feat powers the Yankees to an 8–4 win and a four-games-to-two Series victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers. The World Series title is the Yankees' first since 1962 and their 21st overall.
  • November 22 – Andre Dawson of the Montreal Expos wins the National League Rookie of the Year Award by one vote over Steve Henderson of the New York Mets. Dawson hit .282 with 19 home runs and 65 RBI, while Henderson had .297, 12, 65.
  • December 8 – In an unusual four team, off-season trade, the Atlanta Braves sent Willie Montañez to the New York Mets. Then, the Texas Rangers sent Adrian Devine, Tommy Boggs and Eddie Miller to the Braves; Tom Grieve and a player to be named later to the Mets, and Bert Blyleven to the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Pirates sent Al Oliver and Nelson Norman to the Rangers, and the Mets sent Jon Matlack to the Rangers and John Milner to the Pirates. The Rangers later sent Ken Henderson to the Mets to complete the trade (March 15, 1978).[27]

References

  1. "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. "Baseball-Reference.com". Archived from the original on September 15, 2008. Retrieved August 12, 2008.
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