1883 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1883 throughout the world.

Years in baseball

1883 in sports

  • American football
  • Aquatic sports
  • Association football
  • Athletics
  • Badminton
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Canadian football
  • Chess
  • Climbing
  • Combat sports
    • Sumo
  • Cricket
    • 1882–83
    • 1883
    • 1883–84
  • Cycling
  • Equestrianism
  • Esports
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Ice sports
  • Modern pentathlon
  • Motorsport
  • Racquetball
  • Sailing
  • Skiing
  • Rugby league‎
  • Rugby union
  • Snooker
    • 1882–83
    • 1883–84
  • Squash
  • Table tennis
  • Tennis
  • Triathlon
  • Volleyball
  • Weightlifting

Champions

Inter-league playoff: Philadelphia (AA) declined to play Boston (NL)

Major league baseball final standings

National League final standings

1883 Boston Beaneaters
National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Boston Beaneaters 6335 0.643 41–8 22–27
Chicago White Stockings 5939 0.602 4 36–13 23–26
Providence Grays 5840 0.592 5 34–15 24–25
Cleveland Blues 5542 0.567 31–18 24–24
Buffalo Bisons 4945 0.521 12 36–13 13–32
New York Gothams 4650 0.479 16 28–19 18–31
Detroit Wolverines 4058 0.408 23 23–26 17–32
Philadelphia Quakers 1781 0.173 46 9–40 8–41

American Association final standings

American Association W L Pct. GB Home Road
Philadelphia Athletics 6632 0.673 37–14 29–18
St. Louis Browns 6533 0.663 1 35–14 30–19
Cincinnati Red Stockings 6137 0.622 5 38–13 23–24
New York Metropolitans 5442 0.562 11 29–17 25–25
Louisville Eclipse 5245 0.536 13½ 29–18 23–27
Columbus Buckeyes 3265 0.330 33½ 18–29 14–36
Pittsburgh Alleghenys 3167 0.316 35 18–31 13–36
Baltimore Orioles 2868 0.292 37 18–31 10–37

Statistical leaders

National League statistical leaders

National League
TypeNameStat
AVGDan Brouthers BUF.374
HRBuck Ewing NYG10
RBIDan Brouthers BUF97
WinsCharles Radbourn PRO48
ERAJim McCormick CLE1.84
StrikeoutsJim Whitney BOS345

American Association statistical leaders

American Association
TypeNameStat
AVGEd Swartwood PIT.357
HRHarry Stovey PHA14
RBICharley Jones CIN80
WinsWill White CIN43
ERAWill White CIN2.09
StrikeoutsTim Keefe NYM361

Notable seasons

Charles Radbourn
  • First baseman Dan Brouthers led the NL in batting average (.374), on-base percentage (.397), slugging percentage (.572), adjusted OPS+ (187), hits (159), total bases (243), and runs batted in (97).[1][2]
  • Pitcher Charles Radbourn led the NL with 48 wins. He finished second in the NL in innings pitched (632.1), earned run average (2.05), adjusted ERA+ (150), and strikeouts (315).[3][4]

Events

January–March

  • February 17 – The American Association and the National League, along with the Northwestern League, sign the Tripartite Agreement (also known as the National Agreement). This agreement binds the leagues to respect each other's valid player contracts as well as increasing the size of the reserve list from 6 to 11 players. This leads to relative harmony among the leagues until the Players' League wars of 1889–1890.
  • March 14 – The Peoria Club of the Northwestern League makes a motion to ban blacks, a move directly aimed at Toledo's star catcher, Moses Fleetwood Walker. After heated discussion, the motion is withdrawn and Walker remains eligible to play.
  • March 30 – Charles Fowle, one of the original founders of the National League, and secretary of the St. Louis Brown Stockings from 1875 to 1877, dies in St. Louis.
  • March 31 – The nation's oldest baseball club, the Olympic Town-Ball Club of Philadelphia, marks its 50th anniversary.

April–June

  • April 13 - U.S. President Chester A. Arthur invites members of the recently defunct Forest Cities franchise from the National Association to the white House, making it the first professional sports team to visit a president in Washington D.C. Later that year, the New York Gothams, the precursor to the New York Giants, also visits Arthur in D.C.
  • April 15 – Francis Richter publishes the first issue of Sporting Life which will grow into the leading weekly publication for baseball information and run continuously until 1917.
  • April 24 – Terry Larkin, a pitcher who has not played in the majors since 1880, shoots his wife and a policeman, then tries to kill himself. He attempts suicide the next day and fails again. Both his wife and the police officer survive as well, and Larkin will play in 40 games for the Richmond Virginians in 1884.
  • May 1 – In their inaugural National League game, the New York Gothams defeat the Boston Beaneaters 7–5 in front of 15,000 fans, who include President Ulysses S. Grant. The Philadelphia Quakers, also making their NL debut, lose 4–3 to the Providence Grays.
  • May 3 – John Montgomery Ward becomes the first pitcher to hit 2 home runs in a game as his New York Gothams defeat the Boston Beaneaters 10–9.
  • May 13 – In what was still a very rare occurrence, neither team commits an error as the St. Louis Browns defeat the Louisville Eclipse 4–3.
  • May 28 – Fort Wayne and Indianapolis play the first of 2 games under electric lights.
  • May 30 – Several of the American Association teams play a Memorial Day double-header in 2 different cities. At one point, there is an American Association game being played at the Polo Grounds on the New York Metropolitans field and a National League game being played at the Polo Grounds on the New York Gothams field where the outfield fences back up to one another.
  • June 9 – The Philadelphia Quakers receive special permission from the National League to lower their ticket prices to 25¢ per game in order to compete with the Philadelphia Athletics of the American Association. The Quakers average game attendance quadruples for the remainder of the season.
  • June 16 – The New York Gothams introduce ladies day, where all females are admitted free without restriction. This idea will remain a staple of major league baseball for nearly 100 years.
  • June 28 – Providence Grays player Joe Mulvey is shot in the shoulder while leaving the playing field at Messer Street Grounds in Providence. The shooter, James Murphy, was actually aiming for Mulvey's teammate, Cliff Carroll after Carroll had drenched Murphy with a hose. Within a month, Mulvey would be sold to the Philadelphia Quakers.

July–September

October–December

  • November 22 – New York Gothams owner John B. Day proposes a resolution to prohibit a team from signing a player who has broken the reserve clause of his contract. This resolution, eventually adopted by both the American Association and National League, effectively changes the reserve clause from a device to protect owners from their own greediness to a vindictive weapon to be used against uncooperative players.
  • November 24 – The American Association agree to expand to 12 teams by admitting the Brooklyn Atlantics, Indianapolis Hoosiers, Toledo Blue Stockings and Washington Nationals.

Births

January–March

  • January 1 – Eddie Zimmerman
  • January 3 – Buck Hopkins
  • January 8 – Bob Ingersoll
  • January 27 – John McDonald
  • February 2 – Bill Abstein
  • February 4 – Doc Miller
  • February 5 – Dick Scott
  • February 8 – Joe Cassidy
  • February 13 – Hal Chase
  • February 13 – Harl Maggert
  • February 19 – Harry Curtis
  • February 25 – Jack Hannifin
  • March 1 – Charlie Pickett
  • March 4 – Chet Spencer
  • March 10 – Glenn Liebhardt
  • March 17 – Oscar Stanage
  • March 20 – Pep Clark
  • March 29 – Rube Dessau

April–June

  • April 4 – Bill Hinchman
  • April 4 – John Hummel
  • April 7 – Bill Cooney
  • April 8 – Shag Shaughnessy
  • April 10 – Tex Pruiett
  • April 13 – Mike Simon
  • April 22 – Carl Vandagrift
  • April 25 – Russ Ford
  • April 28 – Harry Gaspar
  • April 29 – Rube Manning
  • April 29 – Amby McConnell
  • April 29 – Bill McGilvray
  • May 5 – Gene Curtis
  • May 6 – Ed Karger
  • May 13 – Jimmy Archer
  • May 19 – Eddie Files
  • May 21 – Eddie Grant
  • May 25 – Heinie Heitmuller
  • June 6 – Jim St. Vrain
  • June 10 – Ernie Lindemann
  • June 16 – Al Mattern
  • June 16 – Red Waller
  • June 29 – Doc Martel

July–September

  • July 5 – Jack Quinn
  • July 5 – Josh Swindell
  • July 8 – Ducky Holmes
  • July 9 – Dave Shean
  • July 14 – Happy Smith
  • July 21 – Larry Pape
  • July 27 – Harry Kane
  • July 31 – Tommy Madden
  • July 31 – Red Munson
  • July 31 – Tuffy Stewart
  • August 4 – Lew Moren
  • August 7 – Tom Richardson
  • August 14 – Bill O'Hara
  • August 17 – Walt Justis
  • August 19 – George Ferguson
  • August 21 – Chief Wilson
  • August 23 – Red Downs
  • August 23 – Lew Richie
  • August 25 – Elmer Brown
  • August 27 – Baldy Louden
  • August 29 – Jimmie Savage
  • August 30 – Bill Brinker
  • August 30 – Sam Edmonston
  • August 31 – Syd Smith
  • September 3 – Art Fromme
  • September 5 – Lefty Leifield
  • September 6 – Dick Bayless
  • September 7 – John Flynn
  • September 17 – Leo Hafford
  • September 18 – Frank Manush
  • September 21 – Bris Lord
  • September 28 – Harley Young

October–December

  • October 3 – Phil Reardon
  • October 4 – Harry Ables
  • October 6 – Red Morgan
  • October 7 – Al Burch
  • October 7 – Phil Lewis
  • October 12 – Charlie French
  • October 13 – Walter Blair
  • October 13 – Harry Huston
  • October 16 – Lew Groh
  • October 16 – Will Harridge
  • October 19 – Walt Miller
  • October 20 – Cuke Barrows
  • October 22 – Bill Carrigan
  • October 28 – Frank Lange
  • October 29 – Del Mason
  • November 3 – Ed Lennox
  • November 5 – Otis Johnson
  • November 11 – Harry Billiard
  • November 16 – Rollie Zeider
  • November 20 – Ben Egan
  • November 20 – Harry Welchonce
  • November 26 – Frank Lobert
  • November 28 – Fred Osborn
  • November 30 – Ben Houser
  • December 4 – Jim Moroney
  • December 8 – Jimmy Wacker
  • December 10 – Jerry Upp
  • December 10 – Jim Stephens
  • December 17 – Rebel Oakes
  • December 18 – Hub Knolls
  • December 26 – Jimmy O'Rourke

Date of birth unknown

  • Mike McCormick
  • Bill Moriarty

Deaths

  • April 17 – John Bergh, 25, back-up catcher for the 1880 Boston Red Stockings.
  • July 5 – Charlie Guth, 27?, pitched a complete game victory in his only major league game in 1880 for the Chicago White Stockings.
  • September 21 – Dan Collins, 29, outfielder who played in 10 games from 1874 to 1876.
  • October 10 – Jim Devlin, 34, pitcher for the Louisville Grays in 1876–77 who led NL in games, innings, starts and strikeouts in its first season; expelled from baseball in the 1877 Louisville Grays scandal

See also

References

  1. "Dan Brouthers Stats". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved May 16, 2021.
  2. "1883 National League Batting Leaders". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved May 16, 2021.
  3. "Old Hoss Radbourne Stats". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved May 16, 2021.
  4. "1883 National League Pitching Leaders". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved May 16, 2021.
  5. "Doubles Team Records". Baseball-Almanac.com. Retrieved 14 May 2012.
  6. "At-Bats Records for Teams: Game Records". Baseball-Almanac.com. Retrieved 14 May 2012.
Sources
  • Nemec, David (1994). The Beer and Whiskey League: The Illustrated History of the American Association-Baseball's Renegade Major League. New York: Lyons & Burford, Publishers ISBN 1-55821-285-X
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