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$\{\text{integers $n$ such that $n$ is even}\}$

It can be true/false so does that mean it's proposition/mathematical statement?

Michael Hardy
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user3461957
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    Reread the answers to your previous question at http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/1341168/how-do-i-know-which-of-these-are-mathematical-statements. This one is a description of a set of integers. It's like the set of primes. It's neither true nor false, it just is. – Ethan Bolker Jun 27 '15 at 16:17
  • No. Sets are neither true nor false. Put "$7\in$" before your first line, and you get a statement. – John Brevik Jun 27 '15 at 16:18
  • To be a statement with true value, you will need to assert something. Right now you have asserted nothing. For example, "if $x$ is an even integer then $x = 2k$ for some integer $k$" is a true assertion. – graydad Jun 27 '15 at 16:19
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    Near duplicate + no reaction whatsoever on the previous page, these are not optimal choices. – Did Jun 27 '15 at 16:23

1 Answers1

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It is only a noun phrase. There is no verb, so it's not a sentence. It can't be true or false.

"Giraffes that are green"

"Giraffes that are green" is not a sentence, but a noun phrase. It cannot be true or false.

"Giraffes that are green are more expensive than elephants." is a complete sentence. It can be true or false.

Michael Hardy
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